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PHP 4 is Dead—Long Live PHP 5

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Software

PHP 4, deployed on tens of millions of servers globally, is among the most successful languages of all time. But its run is coming to an end.

Active development for the scripting language has been discontinued and security updates will conclude in August. And for some developers, PHP 4 will be history before Valentine's Day.

On February 5, a group of influential Open Source projects will collectively stop all new development on their respectively platforms using PHP 4.

However, there are still some holdouts opposing a complete transition to PHP 5 and it's not entirely clear whether or not PHP 4 will ever truly disappear.

PHP 5 isn't a new technology, either. But it's been the anointed successor to PHP 4 since PHP 5's initial launch in 2004.

"We're confident in PHP 5," Andi Gutmans, CTO of Zend, PHP's lead commercial backer, told InternetNews.com.

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