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Battery status, the kernel, and Debian stupidity

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Linux

So, given that I'd be on a holiday next week, I thought it would've been a good idea to do an upgrade of my Debian install on my laptop, in the hope that it'd use less power. The good news was that it seemed like it did, with slightly lower temperature (I guess due to tickless timer on AMD64 in the 2.6.24 kernel). The bad news was that I couldn't even try to quantify it at all: all my battery-measuring tools wouldn't work at all anymore. In particular, no KDE Battery Systray icon anymore, leaving me without any indication at all about how much battery I have left. Hoping it'd be just a KDE update fluke, I checked my other favourite power-related tool, powertop. Unfortunately it also failed to show any relevant information about power usage... Sad

I must say, it's real fun to lose the ability to see your battery status a few days before you leave on a holiday.

Now, you'd think that once you'd point this out, the Debian people would try to fix this post-hase. But nooooh!, apparently having people's applications and systems become useless and being userfriendly is less important to the Debian kernel maintainers than keeping their kernels clean of 'deprecated' /proc entries...

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