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Linux Cheat sheets I have made

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Linux 101

Hey! I'd like to let you know that I have published some of the cheat sheets that I have made.

Here is a link to all the cheat sheets on my blog:
cheat sheets at catonmat (my blog)

They include:
* awk (awk, nawk and gawk) programming language cheat sheet,
* sed, unix stream editor, cheat sheet,
* ed, interactive unix text editor, cheat sheet,
* perl's special variable cheat sheet,
* perl's pack/unpack and printf/sprintf function cheat sheet,
* screen vt100 terminal emulator cheat sheet,
* bash vi editing mode (readline) cheat sheet, and
* bash emacs editing mode cheat sheet.

Tell me what you think and I hope you find them useful! Smile

ps. I have 5-10 more to publish, if you are interested, check back and possibly subscribe to my posts via rss feed Smile

Sincerely,
Peteris Krumins

Set Operations in Unix Shell

Hi all, again! Smile

I just published another article that comes with a cheat sheet.
In this article I implemented various set operations by using awk, comm, sort, uniq, diff, join, head, tail, and other Unix utilities.

The article explains 14 various set operations:

  • Set Membership.
  • Set Equality.
  • Set Cardinality.
  • Subset Test.
  • Set Union.
  • Set Intersection.
  • Set Complement.
  • Set Symmetric Difference.
  • Power Set.
  • Set Cartesian Product.
  • Disjoint Set Test.
  • Empty Set Test.
  • Minimum.
  • Maximum.
The article can be read here: Set Operations in Unix Shell

And the cheat sheets can be downloaded here:

What do you think about it?

Sincerely,
P.Krumins
I love mathematics, physics and computer science
http://www.catonmat.net -- good coders code, great reuse

I just published another

I just published another detailed post on working efficiently on bash command line, together with a cheat sheet.

The article starts by reviewing the keyboard shortcuts for history retrieval in emacs and vi editing modes, then it covers the commands for listing and erasing the history, then it goes into discussing history expansion mechanism - event designators, word designators and their modifiers. Finally the guide lists variables and options to modify the default history behavior.

At the end of the guide I include a link to downloadable cheat sheets in pdf, plain text ascii and latex formats.

Read my article "The Definitive Guide to Bash History"

Download links to cheat sheets:
PDF: bash-history-cheat-sheet.pdf
TXT: bash-history-cheat-sheet.txt
TEX: bash-history-cheat-sheet.tex

Sincerely,
P.Krumins
I love mathematics, physics and computer science
http://www.catonmat.net -- good coders code, great reuse

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