Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Three photo mosaic apps compared

Filed under
Software

Photo mosaics are recreations of one large image composed of tiny tiles of other smaller images. They can be a fun project and make good use of the hundreds of less-than-extraordinary photos on your hard drive. We compared three easy-to-use Linux-based utilities for generating photo mosaics -- Pixelize, Metapixel, and Imosaic -- on speed, quality, and other factors.

Pixelize

Pixelize is the oldest of the three apps; it uses GTK1 for its interface, which may make it stand out from your other desktop applications. You won't be able to use your favorite file selection widget, either, which can be frustrating -- the GTK1 file selector does not remember the last directory you visited, and it does not provide thumbnail previews of image files.

Metapixel

Metapixel is a command-line-only tool, but it offers more flexibility in mosaic creation than does Pixelize. The latest release is version 1.0.2, which you can download from the project's site. Source code as well as Fedora RPMs are available. But as with Pixelize, many modern Linux distros ship Metapixel, so see if you can use an official package if you are not interested in compiling your own binary. Metapixel requires Perl for its image preparation step.

More Here




More in Tux Machines

SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 SP2 to Ship with GNOME 3.20, Public Beta Out Now

Today, June 30, 2016, SUSE has had the great pleasure of announcing the availabilty of a public beta release of its upcoming, commercial SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2 operating system. Read more

Review: Linux Mint 18 (Sarah)

Portugal vs Poland Live Stream Poland vs Portugal Live Streaming

Review: Linux Mint 18 (Sarah)

If you were looking to jump the Ubuntu ship completely, then we recommend taking a look at our recent Review of Fedora 24. It’s equally as good as Mint 18 and equally worthy of your consideration. Between Linux Mint 18 and Fedora 24, we reckon it’s exciting times in the Linux world. With the exception and onset of the boring world of vanilla Ubuntu releases, Linux feels reinvigorated and fresh once again. Jump on board, because it can only get better from here. Read more

Security Leftovers