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Game Boy Micro

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Gaming

The Game Boy Micro is so small...

You already know that the Game Boy Micro is small when you hear people tell you that it's just barely bigger than the cartridge that fits into it, but you don't really get a sense for just how small it is until you get your hands on it. Your thumb just about dwarfs it.

The AC adapter for the system is nearly as big as the system it charges -- the charger is slightly thicker, almost exactly as tall, and a little more than half as wide. The whole system is smaller than just the screen on Sony's PSP. It almost fits inside a Nintendo DS game case. We're talking very, very small.

IGN regular and WayForward fellow Guppi has taken on the dare of fitting four Game Boy Micro systems in his mouth, and we think he can do it.

The GB Micro's chief feature is its incredible size, but the thing that we find almost more impressive is its screen. Vastly superior to the GBA SP screen, the brightness on this tiny doodad is even brighter than the Nintendo DS, and approaching the luminance of the PSP.

Full Story.

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