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Marble's Secrets Part II - Walking In The Shoes Of Slartibartfast ...

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Software

Part II will show how Marble manages to provide the biggest bang for the byte when it comes to providing map data. It outlines how we managed to get the default map squeezed into the 10MB package that the Marble-Qt version gets shipped with.

Why Marble is the perfect choice for Asus EeePC, OLPC & Co and some Embedded Devices ...

If you followed our last part closely and did a bit hands-on work then you maybe have stumbled across the contents of ~/.marble/data/maps/earth/srtm . This one contains part of the data for the default topographic view which is pretty colorful to mimic the appearance of a typical school atlas. Although the Marble application focuses on the educational aspect that's only one reason why we default to the topographic map:
If you look at the actual tiles of the "Atlas" map then you will realize that they are all provided as grayscale bitmaps! If you actually replace "false" by "true" in line 10 of the srtm.dgml-textfile (which is likely placed in /usr/share/apps/marble/data/maps/earth/srtm/srtm.dgml if you're on a Linux/UNIX system) then your line should look like this:

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