Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Five must-have apps for a new Linux install

Filed under
Software

I tend to hammer my Ubuntu laptop. Running a website like Tectonic means I am constantly installing new applications to try them out. Many of which I later have to remove or lie forgotten on the hard disk until I start to wonder where the +40GB of free hard disk space went to.

My most recent re-install was this weekend.

So, having re-installed a brand new copy of Ubuntu and required updates, there are a few applications that I immediately download because, without them, I would not be able to do most of my day-to-day work. Here, in no particular order, are the five application or tools I have to have but aren’t included in a default Ubuntu install. If you work in media or website development many of these might sound familiar.

gFTP

gFTP has been around since the early days of Linux and while not flashy and full of features it does the job at hand, which is upload and download files for the sites I manage. gFTP’s clear interface and simple navigation make it an essential part of my desktop arsenal. I know that Ubuntu has the ability to connect to FTP sites using the nautilus file manager but I still find the side-by-side arrangement of gFTP, and the ability to compare a local development site with a live hosted one, essential. gFTP is also lightweight and quick, which makes it essential.

Inkscape

More Here




More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Server Administration

  • Bash Tips for Linux Sysadmins
    The Bash shell is a fundamental Linux tool and, in this era of containers and clusters and microservices, good old-fashioned Linux system administration skills are as relevant as ever. Today, we'll learn about running other command shells, Bash built-ins, configuration files, and shell expansion.
  • Poll: How do you abbreviate system administrator?
  • 5 tools to support distributed sysadmin teams
    Remotely-distributed system administration teams provide around-the-clock coverage without anyone losing sleep, and have the benefit of drawing from a global talent pool. The OpenStack global infrastructure team relies on these five open source tools to communicate, and to coordinate our work.

Bodhi 4 Alpha, More Tor Heads Roll, Wily Werewolf EOL

Today the Bodhi project announced announced the release of version 4.0.0 Alpha for 64-bit computers only. The final will include support for 32-bit. Elsewhere, Ubuntu 15.10 hit its end of life and the Tor project dismissed two more individuals for inappropriate behavior. Carla Schroder shared some Bash tips for sysadmins and Technews listed commands to avoid. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux