Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Five must-have apps for a new Linux install

Filed under
Software

I tend to hammer my Ubuntu laptop. Running a website like Tectonic means I am constantly installing new applications to try them out. Many of which I later have to remove or lie forgotten on the hard disk until I start to wonder where the +40GB of free hard disk space went to.

My most recent re-install was this weekend.

So, having re-installed a brand new copy of Ubuntu and required updates, there are a few applications that I immediately download because, without them, I would not be able to do most of my day-to-day work. Here, in no particular order, are the five application or tools I have to have but aren’t included in a default Ubuntu install. If you work in media or website development many of these might sound familiar.

gFTP

gFTP has been around since the early days of Linux and while not flashy and full of features it does the job at hand, which is upload and download files for the sites I manage. gFTP’s clear interface and simple navigation make it an essential part of my desktop arsenal. I know that Ubuntu has the ability to connect to FTP sites using the nautilus file manager but I still find the side-by-side arrangement of gFTP, and the ability to compare a local development site with a live hosted one, essential. gFTP is also lightweight and quick, which makes it essential.

Inkscape

More Here




More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 Received Well by Ubuntu Phone Users, Work on OTA-7 Starts

As Łukasz Zemczak is currently in a two-week holiday, Canonical's Timo Jyrinki sent the usual report to inform us all about the good and bad things that happened in the Ubuntu Touch world. Read more

Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) to Ship with OpenStack Liberty

Canonical's James Page posted an interesting message on the Ubuntu mailing list, informing all Ubuntu developers about the steps they need to take in order to update the OpenStack cloud software to version 2015.2.0 (Liberty) in Ubuntu 15.10. Read more

Mark Shuttleworth Details Ubuntu 15.10 Highlights [VIDEO]

Ubuntu developers are closing in on the next major release, with the Ubuntu 15.10 Wily Werewolf set to debut on October 22. Ubuntu 15.10 is in many respects an incremental release ahead of the 16.04 Long Term Support release in 2016. Among the key innovations in 15.10 is wider use of the Snappy technology for packaging, though it won't replace the core .deb packaging system anytime soon, if ever. Read more

Improving Security for Bugzilla

Openness, transparency, and security are all central to the Mozilla mission. That’s why we publish security bugs once they’re no longer dangerous, and it’s why we’re writing a blog post about unauthorized access to our infrastructure. We have notified the relevant law enforcement authorities about this incident, and may take additional steps based on the results of any further investigations. Read more