Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gentoo Monthly Newsletter: 18 February 2008

Filed under
Gentoo

1. Introduction

This month in the GMN

Welcome to the second issue of the Gentoo Monthly Newsletter. To begin with, we would like to thank the entire community for the overwhelming response to the GMN's inaugural issue. We received a lot of encouraging feedback and hope that you will continue to write in. Remember, the GMN is what its readers want it to be - please see the section on how you can get involved - at the end of the newsletter for more information.

This month's issue implements some of the interesting suggestions we received from our readers. The security statistics have been removed, since it seemed to add a lot of clutter with little value-addition to the newsletter. You can still monitor GLSAs in a variety of ways though - by using glsa-check (part of gentoolkit), by subscribing to the feed on the GLSA page or the gentoo-announce mailing list.

Graphical bugzilla and package statistics is another feature we implemented, don't forget to see the cool graphs and charts! In tune with the feature on our front page announcements, you can now discuss particular issues of the Gentoo Monthly Newsletter in the forum. Discuss this newsletter!

We hope you enjoy reading this edition of the GMN.

2. Gentoo News

Gentoo Trustee Elections

The Gentoo Trustee elections are currently in progress. After nearly a month of nominations, we are left with 8 candidates for the posts. The polls will be open until February 28. Everybody who has ever voted in a trustee election or has been a Gentoo developer for the last 365 days (or more, from the date of close of election poll) is eligible to vote. You can get more information on the election and on each candidate's manifesto on the trustee election page.

Kernel security exploits: Upgrade ASAP
KDE 4.0.1 in the tree

Full Newsletter




More in Tux Machines

Create Your Own Free Software Project

Free software is tremendously democratic. Anyone with a computer and an internet connection can get involved – there are no barriers of wealth or social status. Being educated in computer science helps, but there are plenty of people working on free software at Red Hat, Canonical and Intel who’ve never been to university, and who acquired their positions simply by writing great code. So anyone can contribute to free software, and anyone can start a new project as well. But how do you turn that great idea in your head into a real-life success? The likes of SourceForge and GitHub are littered with now-abandoned projects with barely 50 lines of code, which initially started as grand ideas to create the next killer music player, email client or game. Yes, free software is awesome, but 95% of projects never get off the ground or are abandoned after a few weeks. Read more

Ubuntu 6.06 To Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Performance Benchmarks: 10 Years Of Linux Performance

As I'm in the process of retiring an old AMD Opteron dual-socket system, prior to decommissioning it, I figured it would be fun to go back and re-benchmark all of the Ubuntu LTS releases going all the way back to the legendary 6.06 Dapper Drake release. So here are some fresh benchmarks of this AMD Shanghai system with eight cores and 16GB of RAM when re-benchmarking the releases from Ubuntu 6.06 through the latest Ubuntu 16.04 LTS development state. Read more

The Talos Secure Workstation Is A High-Performance Libre System

Raptor Engineering is working on the Talos Secure Workstation, which is being advertised as a high-performance, open-to-the-firmware system that is much better than the commonly antiquated "freed" x86 systems. However, getting a high-performance, free software friendly workstation doesn't come cheap. Read more

Ubuntu Devs Might Skip the OTA-9.5 Hotfix in Favour of a Massive OTA-10 Update

We had just been informed by Łukasz Zemczak of Canonical about the latest things happening in preparation for the upcoming OTA updates for Ubuntu Phone devices. Read more