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Gentoo Monthly Newsletter: 18 February 2008

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Gentoo

1. Introduction

This month in the GMN

Welcome to the second issue of the Gentoo Monthly Newsletter. To begin with, we would like to thank the entire community for the overwhelming response to the GMN's inaugural issue. We received a lot of encouraging feedback and hope that you will continue to write in. Remember, the GMN is what its readers want it to be - please see the section on how you can get involved - at the end of the newsletter for more information.

This month's issue implements some of the interesting suggestions we received from our readers. The security statistics have been removed, since it seemed to add a lot of clutter with little value-addition to the newsletter. You can still monitor GLSAs in a variety of ways though - by using glsa-check (part of gentoolkit), by subscribing to the feed on the GLSA page or the gentoo-announce mailing list.

Graphical bugzilla and package statistics is another feature we implemented, don't forget to see the cool graphs and charts! In tune with the feature on our front page announcements, you can now discuss particular issues of the Gentoo Monthly Newsletter in the forum. Discuss this newsletter!

We hope you enjoy reading this edition of the GMN.

2. Gentoo News

Gentoo Trustee Elections

The Gentoo Trustee elections are currently in progress. After nearly a month of nominations, we are left with 8 candidates for the posts. The polls will be open until February 28. Everybody who has ever voted in a trustee election or has been a Gentoo developer for the last 365 days (or more, from the date of close of election poll) is eligible to vote. You can get more information on the election and on each candidate's manifesto on the trustee election page.

Kernel security exploits: Upgrade ASAP
KDE 4.0.1 in the tree

Full Newsletter




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