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gtkpod: a better alternative than iTunes

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Software

I am going to break from my normal routine of ranting and/or raving about one issue or another and go old school by looking at a Linux application. That’s right - a good ol’ fashion Linux application.

I have recently been inundated with questions about using an iPod (or iPhone) with Linux. I have written about Rockbox and how to “Open Source” your iPod, but for the average user that is not a viable option (Firmware? Do what????). So instead I am going to introduce those of you who do not know to an application that, in my opinion, is much better than the original (the original being iTunes.) Gtkpod is a GTK application that allows the user to sync their iPod with Linux. Gtkpod supports first through fifth generation iPods and does, pretty much, everything iTunes does. So let’s first take a look at the features. Gtkpod can:

* Read your existing iTunesDB (this is nice because it can actually take the songs off your iPod and put them onto your computer without needing a third-party application).
* Add music to your iPod.
* View, add and modify Cover Art.
* Browse contents of hard disk and drag/drop songs into playlists.
* Create and modify playlists, including smart playlists.
* Configure the charset the ID3 tags are encoded in from within gtkpod.
* Extract tag information (artist, album, title…) from the filename if you supply a template.
* Detect duplicates when adding songs (optional).
* Remove and export tracks from your iPod.

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