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Linux FUD Pattern #5: Linux is not secure

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There are some out there who would like for you to believe that Linux is unsafe. What better way to instill fear than to form doubt in your mind about a system’s abilities to protect your data?

A reason for the supposed lack of security often cited in FUD is the origin and maintenance of Linux in the “hacker” community. The term “hacker” has evolved from a term of endearment to one associated almost exclusively with cybercrime. To say that Linux was created and is supported by hackers gives the impression that the OS and its related applications are riddled with built-in security holes, backdoors for gaining system access, spyware for purposes of identity theft, hidden network tools that help intruders cover their footprints as they travel from machine to machine through cyberspace, and any other sort of malicious software for various and sundry purposes. To “hack” no longer means to “tinker” or to “fiddle with”, but to “break into” and “cause harm”. The term may conjure mental images of a scene from a horror movie, an evil man with an axe about to hack his way through the door to the house protected by the dark of night. Such is the imagery used to spawn fear.

Let’s examine Linux security by answering two questions. Do security components exist? And, can they be trusted?

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