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Original Articles from 2007

  1. Why Dolphin should have tabs* - Dec 30, 2007
  2. Turkey's Pardus distro is easy to use - Dec 12, 2007
  3. How to use the nvidia driver with the KDE Four Live CD* - Dec 12, 2007
  4. Paldo melds source-based and binary in one distro - Dec 11, 2007
  5. First look at Geubuntu 7.10 - Dec 10, 2007
  6. First look at Linux Mint 4.0 - Nov 26, 2007
  7. Gosh, gOS is good - Nov 16, 2007
  8. DSL 4.0: Damn small improvement - Nov 13, 2007
  9. ubuntu vs opensuse - Nov 12, 2007
  10. First look at Ubuntu Studio 7.10 - Nov 05, 2007
  11. From a PCLOS user: Kubuntu Gutsy doesn't totally reek* - Nov 3, 2007
  12. Hans Reiser: Did He or Didn't He? - Nov 03, 2007
  13. Vixta: Nice concept, incomplete execution - Oct 26, 2007
  14. "Why Ubuntu (Still) Sucks"...Why care?* - Oct 24, 2007
  15. Linux Projects' Best Kept Secret - Oct 20, 2007
  16. Battle of the Titans: Mandriva 2008 vs openSUSE 10.3 - Oct 19, 2007
  17. Wine is Getting Good* - Oct 16, 2007
  18. diff Power_Pack Free - Oct 16, 2007
  19. Mandriva 2008.0 Rocks - Oct 12, 2007
  20. openSUSE 10.3 in review: A solid Linux desktop* - Oct 12, 2007
  21. Quick Look at Ubuntu 7.10 Release Candidate - Oct 12, 2007
  22. First look at Puppy Linux 3.00 - Oct 08, 2007
  23. First look at PC-BSD 1.4 - Oct 01, 2007
  24. openSUSE 10.3 RC 1 Report - Sep 26, 2007
  25. Kind of fond of FaunOS - Sep 25, 2007
  26. KateOS - Getting Better with Age - Sep 19, 2007
  27. ALT: Linux from Russia - Sep 17, 2007
  28. openSUSE 10.3 Beta 3 Report - Sep 10, 2007
  29. Beta Review: Kanotix 2007 "Thorhammer" RC5B* Sep 7, 2007
  30. openSUSE 10.3 Beta (1 &) 2 Report - Aug 26, 2007
  31. Sidux 2007-03.1 "Gaia": A closer look* - Aug 23, 2007
  32. Sidux 2007-03 'Gaia' -- a quick look* - Aug 22, 2007
  33. Freespire aspires, but fails to inspire - Aug 20, 2007
  34. Sabayon Linux: Something for everyone - Aug 14, 2007
  35. Mandriva 2008 Beta 1, "Cassini" -- A few thoughts* -- Aug 11, 2007
  36. Absolute Linux is an absolute winner - Aug 07, 2007
  37. Wolvix 1.1.0 Mini-Review & Screenshots - Aug 06, 2007
  38. openSUSE 10.3 Alpha 7 report - Aug 04, 2007
  39. Mini-Review: Puppy Linux 2.17 - July 23, 2007
  40. openSUSE 10.3 Alpha 6 Report - July 20, 2007
  41. With new code base, Supergamer is fun again - July 18, 2007
  42. Mini-Reviews: CentOS 5.0 LiveCD, Berry 0.82, and AntiX "Spartacus" - July 16, 2007
  43. Venerable Slackware 12 gets a sporty new wardrobe - July 10, 2007
  44. First look at Elive 1.0 - July 09, 2007
  45. Slackware 12: The anti-'buntu* - July 08, 2007
  46. A sysadmin toolbox for Web site maintenance - July 5, 2007
  47. Mini Review of a Tiny PCLOS - July 2, 2007
  48. Yoper 3.0 requires some tinkering - June 28, 2007
  49. New AntiX distro makes older hardware usable - June 26, 2007
  50. OpenSUSE 10.3 Alpha 5 report - June 20, 2007
  51. Alternative GUIs: GoblinX* - June 16, 2007
  52. Granular Linux - What Am I Missing? - June 11, 2007
  53. Alternative GUIs: SymphonyOS* - Jun 9, 2007
  54. Sidux vs. Mint: Can You Live the Pure Open Source Life? - June 4, 2007
  55. Fedora 7 "Moonshine": Freedom vs. Ease-of-Use* - Jun 1, 2007
  56. How-to Edit Grub - May 26, 2007
  57. New PCLinuxOS 2007 looks great, works well - May 23, 2007
  58. VectorLinux SOHO: A better Slackware than Slackware - May 21, 2007
  59. DeLi Linux 0.7.2, a distribution for very old computers - May 21, 2007
  60. openSUSE 10.3 alpha 4 report - May 18, 2007
  61. Ubuntu Studio 7.04 - The Crowning Jewel of the Ubuntu Family - May 12, 2007
  62. Mandriva Spring - Beautiful Change of Season - Apr 30, 2007
  63. Blue Belle: Running PCLinuxOS Test 4* - Apr 28, 2007
  64. Linux Minty Fresh - Apr 24, 2007
  65. Fallen Under the Spell of Arch Voodoo - Apr 20, 2007
  66. openSUSE 10.3 alpha 3 Report - Apr 13, 2007
  67. Quick Little Tour of Opera's New Speed Dial - Apr 11, 2007
  68. GoblinX Premium 2007.1 - Apr 10, 2007
  69. Review of Kubuntu 7.04 Beta* - Apr 07, 2007
  70. Linux Mint "Bianca" KDE Edition Beta 020: A Small Review* - Apr 06, 2007
  71. SimplyMepis 6.5 - Simply Wonderful - Apr 05, 2007
  72. PCLinuxOS becomes PCUbuntuOS - Apr 1, 2007
  73. The Lazy Guide to Installing Knoppix on a USB Key* - Mar 28, 2007
  74. SabayonLinux 3.3 Mini on that HP Laptop - Mar 27, 2007
  75. Sam Linux 2007 - For the XFCE Lover - Mar 23, 2007
  76. A New Year, A New Kwort - Mar 21, 2007
  77. A New Open Source Model? - Mar 19, 2007
  78. openSUSE 10.3 alpha 2 report - Mar 17, 2007
  79. Peeking in the Windows of ReactOS 0.3.1 - Mar 14, 2007
  80. Kicking the tires of Mandriva 2007.1 beta 2 - Mar 04, 2007
  81. Quick Cruise Around Fedora 7 Test 2 - Mar 02, 2007
  82. Testdriving Sidux 2007 - Feb 28, 2007
  83. First look at VectorLinux 5.8 SOHO - Feb 27, 2007
  84. Script KATE to Automagically Compile/Execute Programs* - Feb 25, 2007
  85. openSUSE 10.3 alpha 1 Report - Feb 19, 2007
  86. SaxenOS and SimplyMEPIS - bumps in the middle of the road - Feb 19, 2007
  87. Year of the Linux desktop? Who cares!* - Feb 4, 2007
  88. SaxenOS 1.1 rc2 - Feb 4, 2007
  89. 10 reasons to try PCLinuxOS* - Jan 25, 2007
  90. PCLinuxOS 2007 Beta 2 (Test 1) - Jan 20, 2007
  91. NimbleX 2007 - As the Name Implies... - Jan 16, 2007
  92. SabayonLinux 3.26 on my HP Pavilion Laptop - Jan 11, 2007
  93. TestDriving SimplyMepis 6.0-4 Beta 2 - Jan 7, 2007

* : By others.









More in Tux Machines

Licensing With GPL: Greater Certainty

  • A Movement Builds as a Diverse Group of 14 Additional Leaders Seek Greater Predictability in Open Source Licensing
    Today’s announcement demonstrates the expanded breadth and depth of support for the GPL Cooperation Commitment. Companies adopting the commitment now span geographic regions, include eight Fortune 100 companies, and represent a wide range of industries from enterprise software and hardware to consumer electronics, chip manufacturing to cloud computing, and social networking to automotive. The companies making the commitment represent more than 39 percent of corporate contributions to the Linux kernel, including six of the top 10 corporate contributors.1
  • ARM: Arm joins industry leaders in commitment to fair enforcement of open source licenses
    Today, Red Hat announced that several leading technology companies, including Arm, are joining a diverse coalition of organizations that have come together to promote greater predictability in open source license enforcement. Alongside Amazon, Canonical, Linaro, Toyota, VMware and many others we have committed to ensure fair opportunity for our licensees to correct errors in compliance with their GPL and LGPL licensed software before taking action to terminate the licenses.
  • Debian "stretch" 9.5 Update Now Available, Red Hat Announces New Adopters of the GPL Cooperation Commitment, Linux Audio Conference 2018 Videos Now Available, Latte Dock v0.8 Released and More
    Red Hat announced that 14 additional companies have adopted the GPL Cooperation Commitment, which means that "more than 39 percent of corporate contributions to the Linux kernel, including six of the top 10 contributors" are now represented. According to the Red Hat press release, these commitments "reflect the belief that responsible compliance in open source licensing is important and that license enforcement in the open source ecosystem operates by different norms." Companies joining the growing movement include Amazon, Arm, Canonical, GitLab, Intel Corporation, Liferay, Linaro, MariaDB, NEC, Pivotal, Royal Philips, SAS, Toyota and VMware.

Opinion: GitHub vs GitLab

So, Microsoft bought GitHub, and many people are confused or worried. It's not a new phenomenon when any large company buys any smaller company, and people are right to be worried, although I argue that their timing is wrong. Like Microsoft, GitHub has made some useful contributions to free and open-source software, but let's not forget that GitHub's main product is proprietary software. And, it's not just some innocuous web service either; GitHub makes and sells a proprietary software package you can download and run on your own server called GitHub Enterprise (GHE). Let's remember how we got here. BitMover made a tool called BitKeeper, a proprietary version control system that allowed free-of-charge licenses to free software projects. In 2002, the Linux kernel switched to using BitKeeper for its version control, although some notable developers made the noble choice to refuse to use the proprietary program. Many others did not, and for a number of years, kernel development was hampered by BitKeeper's restrictive noncommercial licenses. In 2005, Andrew Tridgell, working at OSDL, developed a client that bypassed this restriction, and as a result, BitMover removed licenses to BitKeeper from all OSDL employees—including Linus Torvalds. Eventually, all non-commercial licenses were stopped, and new licenses included clauses preventing the development of alternative version control systems. As a result of this, two new projects were born: Mercurial and Git. Created in a few short weeks in 2005, Git quickly became the version control system for Linux development. Proprietary version control tools aren't common in free software development, but proprietary collaboration websites have been around for some time. One of the earliest collaboration websites still around today is Sourceforge. Sourceforge was created in the late 1990s by VA Software, and the code behind the project was released in 2000. Read more

Comparing Latencies and Power consumption with various CPU schedulers

The low-latency kernel offering with Ubuntu provides a kernel tuned for low-latency environments using low-latency kernel configuration options. The x86 kernels by default run with the Intel-Pstate CPU scheduler set to run with the powersave scaling governor biased towards power efficiency. While power efficiency is fine for most use-cases, it can introduce latencies due to the fact that the CPU can be running at a low frequency to save power and also switching from a deep C state when idle to a higher C state when servicing an event can also increase on latencies. Read more

csplit: A Better Way to Split File in Linux Based on its Content

Learn some practical examples of the GNU coreutils csplit command for splitting files in Linux. It’s more useful than the popular split command. Read more