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Original Articles from 2007

  1. Why Dolphin should have tabs* - Dec 30, 2007
  2. Turkey's Pardus distro is easy to use - Dec 12, 2007
  3. How to use the nvidia driver with the KDE Four Live CD* - Dec 12, 2007
  4. Paldo melds source-based and binary in one distro - Dec 11, 2007
  5. First look at Geubuntu 7.10 - Dec 10, 2007
  6. First look at Linux Mint 4.0 - Nov 26, 2007
  7. Gosh, gOS is good - Nov 16, 2007
  8. DSL 4.0: Damn small improvement - Nov 13, 2007
  9. ubuntu vs opensuse - Nov 12, 2007
  10. First look at Ubuntu Studio 7.10 - Nov 05, 2007
  11. From a PCLOS user: Kubuntu Gutsy doesn't totally reek* - Nov 3, 2007
  12. Hans Reiser: Did He or Didn't He? - Nov 03, 2007
  13. Vixta: Nice concept, incomplete execution - Oct 26, 2007
  14. "Why Ubuntu (Still) Sucks"...Why care?* - Oct 24, 2007
  15. Linux Projects' Best Kept Secret - Oct 20, 2007
  16. Battle of the Titans: Mandriva 2008 vs openSUSE 10.3 - Oct 19, 2007
  17. Wine is Getting Good* - Oct 16, 2007
  18. diff Power_Pack Free - Oct 16, 2007
  19. Mandriva 2008.0 Rocks - Oct 12, 2007
  20. openSUSE 10.3 in review: A solid Linux desktop* - Oct 12, 2007
  21. Quick Look at Ubuntu 7.10 Release Candidate - Oct 12, 2007
  22. First look at Puppy Linux 3.00 - Oct 08, 2007
  23. First look at PC-BSD 1.4 - Oct 01, 2007
  24. openSUSE 10.3 RC 1 Report - Sep 26, 2007
  25. Kind of fond of FaunOS - Sep 25, 2007
  26. KateOS - Getting Better with Age - Sep 19, 2007
  27. ALT: Linux from Russia - Sep 17, 2007
  28. openSUSE 10.3 Beta 3 Report - Sep 10, 2007
  29. Beta Review: Kanotix 2007 "Thorhammer" RC5B* Sep 7, 2007
  30. openSUSE 10.3 Beta (1 &) 2 Report - Aug 26, 2007
  31. Sidux 2007-03.1 "Gaia": A closer look* - Aug 23, 2007
  32. Sidux 2007-03 'Gaia' -- a quick look* - Aug 22, 2007
  33. Freespire aspires, but fails to inspire - Aug 20, 2007
  34. Sabayon Linux: Something for everyone - Aug 14, 2007
  35. Mandriva 2008 Beta 1, "Cassini" -- A few thoughts* -- Aug 11, 2007
  36. Absolute Linux is an absolute winner - Aug 07, 2007
  37. Wolvix 1.1.0 Mini-Review & Screenshots - Aug 06, 2007
  38. openSUSE 10.3 Alpha 7 report - Aug 04, 2007
  39. Mini-Review: Puppy Linux 2.17 - July 23, 2007
  40. openSUSE 10.3 Alpha 6 Report - July 20, 2007
  41. With new code base, Supergamer is fun again - July 18, 2007
  42. Mini-Reviews: CentOS 5.0 LiveCD, Berry 0.82, and AntiX "Spartacus" - July 16, 2007
  43. Venerable Slackware 12 gets a sporty new wardrobe - July 10, 2007
  44. First look at Elive 1.0 - July 09, 2007
  45. Slackware 12: The anti-'buntu* - July 08, 2007
  46. A sysadmin toolbox for Web site maintenance - July 5, 2007
  47. Mini Review of a Tiny PCLOS - July 2, 2007
  48. Yoper 3.0 requires some tinkering - June 28, 2007
  49. New AntiX distro makes older hardware usable - June 26, 2007
  50. OpenSUSE 10.3 Alpha 5 report - June 20, 2007
  51. Alternative GUIs: GoblinX* - June 16, 2007
  52. Granular Linux - What Am I Missing? - June 11, 2007
  53. Alternative GUIs: SymphonyOS* - Jun 9, 2007
  54. Sidux vs. Mint: Can You Live the Pure Open Source Life? - June 4, 2007
  55. Fedora 7 "Moonshine": Freedom vs. Ease-of-Use* - Jun 1, 2007
  56. How-to Edit Grub - May 26, 2007
  57. New PCLinuxOS 2007 looks great, works well - May 23, 2007
  58. VectorLinux SOHO: A better Slackware than Slackware - May 21, 2007
  59. DeLi Linux 0.7.2, a distribution for very old computers - May 21, 2007
  60. openSUSE 10.3 alpha 4 report - May 18, 2007
  61. Ubuntu Studio 7.04 - The Crowning Jewel of the Ubuntu Family - May 12, 2007
  62. Mandriva Spring - Beautiful Change of Season - Apr 30, 2007
  63. Blue Belle: Running PCLinuxOS Test 4* - Apr 28, 2007
  64. Linux Minty Fresh - Apr 24, 2007
  65. Fallen Under the Spell of Arch Voodoo - Apr 20, 2007
  66. openSUSE 10.3 alpha 3 Report - Apr 13, 2007
  67. Quick Little Tour of Opera's New Speed Dial - Apr 11, 2007
  68. GoblinX Premium 2007.1 - Apr 10, 2007
  69. Review of Kubuntu 7.04 Beta* - Apr 07, 2007
  70. Linux Mint "Bianca" KDE Edition Beta 020: A Small Review* - Apr 06, 2007
  71. SimplyMepis 6.5 - Simply Wonderful - Apr 05, 2007
  72. PCLinuxOS becomes PCUbuntuOS - Apr 1, 2007
  73. The Lazy Guide to Installing Knoppix on a USB Key* - Mar 28, 2007
  74. SabayonLinux 3.3 Mini on that HP Laptop - Mar 27, 2007
  75. Sam Linux 2007 - For the XFCE Lover - Mar 23, 2007
  76. A New Year, A New Kwort - Mar 21, 2007
  77. A New Open Source Model? - Mar 19, 2007
  78. openSUSE 10.3 alpha 2 report - Mar 17, 2007
  79. Peeking in the Windows of ReactOS 0.3.1 - Mar 14, 2007
  80. Kicking the tires of Mandriva 2007.1 beta 2 - Mar 04, 2007
  81. Quick Cruise Around Fedora 7 Test 2 - Mar 02, 2007
  82. Testdriving Sidux 2007 - Feb 28, 2007
  83. First look at VectorLinux 5.8 SOHO - Feb 27, 2007
  84. Script KATE to Automagically Compile/Execute Programs* - Feb 25, 2007
  85. openSUSE 10.3 alpha 1 Report - Feb 19, 2007
  86. SaxenOS and SimplyMEPIS - bumps in the middle of the road - Feb 19, 2007
  87. Year of the Linux desktop? Who cares!* - Feb 4, 2007
  88. SaxenOS 1.1 rc2 - Feb 4, 2007
  89. 10 reasons to try PCLinuxOS* - Jan 25, 2007
  90. PCLinuxOS 2007 Beta 2 (Test 1) - Jan 20, 2007
  91. NimbleX 2007 - As the Name Implies... - Jan 16, 2007
  92. SabayonLinux 3.26 on my HP Pavilion Laptop - Jan 11, 2007
  93. TestDriving SimplyMepis 6.0-4 Beta 2 - Jan 7, 2007

* : By others.









More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Devices: Beelink S1 Mini PC, Aaeon’s SBC, Kobo and LEDE

  • Beelink S1 Mini PC and Linux – Comedy Gold
    The Beelink S1 is a small, silent mini PC released in August 2017 retailing for around 300 dollars (250 euros). It’s produced by Shenzhen AZW Technology Co Ltd, a Chinese company that focuses on Android smart TV boxes, Intel mini PCs, and home cloud TV boxes. The S1 ships with an activated copy of Windows 10. But what makes this mini PC interesting? For starters, it purports to run Ubuntu. Combined with a quad core Celeron CPU, dual monitor support (HDMI and VGA), 4K video, expansion options, together with a raft of other features, the machine looks a mouthwatering prospect compared to many other mini PCs.
  • Kaby Lake Pico-ITX SBC features dual M.2 slots
    Aaeon’s “PICO-KBU1” SBC is built on Intel 7th Gen U-series CPUs with up to 16GB DDR4, dual GbE ports, and M.2 B-key and E-Key expansion. The PICO-KBU1 SBC is equipped with Intel’s dual-core, 15W TDP 7th Gen U-series CPUs from the latest Kaby Lake generation. Other 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX boards that run Kaby Lake U-Series processors include Axiomtek’s PICO512. As usual with Aaeon, no OS support is listed.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.9995 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    It has been ages that I haven’t updated the MegaUpdate package for Kobo. Now that a new and seemingly rather bug-free and quick firmware release (4.6.9995) has been released, I finally took the time to update the whole package to the latest releases of all the included items. The update includes all my favorite patches and features: Kobo Start Menu, koreader, coolreader, pbchess, ssh access, custom dictionaries, and some side-loaded fonts.
  • LEDE v17.01.4 service release
    Version 17.01.4 of the LEDE router distribution is available with a number of important fixes. "While this release includes fixes for the bugs in the WPA Protocol disclosed earlier this week, these fixes do not fix the problem on the client-side. You still need to update all your client devices. As some client devices might never receive an update, an optional AP-side workaround was introduced in hostapd to complicate these attacks, slowing them down."

Samsung Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • FOSDEM 2018 Real-Time Communications Call for Participation
  • Top Bank, Legal and Software Industry Executives to Keynote at the Open Source Strategy Forum
  • Copyleft is Dead. Long live Copyleft!
    As you may have noticed, we recently re-licensed mgmt from the AGPL (Affero General Public License) to the regular GPL. This is a post explaining the decision and which hopefully includes some insights at the intersection of technology and legal issues.
  • Crowdsourcing the way to a more flexible strategic plan
    Trust the community. Opening a feedback platform to anyone on campus seems risky, but in hindsight I'd do it again in a heartbeat. The responses we received were very constructive; in fact, I rarely received negative and unproductive remarks. When people learned about our honest efforts at improving the community, they responded with kindness and support. By giving the community a voice—by really democratizing the effort—we achieved a surprising amount of campus-wide buy-in in a short period of time. Transparency is best. By keeping as many of our efforts as public as possible, we demonstrated that we were truly listening to our customers and understanding the effects of the outdated technology policies and decisions that were keeping them from doing their best work. I've always been a proponent of the idea that everyone is an agent of innovation; we just needed a tool that allowed everyone to make suggestions. Iterate, iterate, iterate. Crowdsourcing our first-year IT initiatives helped us create the most flexible and customer-centric plan we possibly could. The pressure to move quickly and lay down a comprehensive strategic plan is very real; however, by delaying that work and focusing on the evolving set of data flowing from our community, we were actually able to better demonstrate our commitment to our customers. That helped us build critical reputational capital, which paid off when we did eventually present a long-term strategic plan—because people already knew we could achieve results. It also helped us recruit strong allies and learn who we could trust to advance more complicated initiatives.
  • Reform is a DIY, modular, portable computer (work in progress)
    Want a fully functional laptop that works out of the box? There are plenty to choose from. Want a model that you can upgrade? That’s a bit tougher to find: some modern laptops don’t even let you replace the RAM. Then there’s the Reform. It’s a new DIY, modular laptop that’s designed to be easy to upgrade and modify. The CAD designs will even be available if you want to 3D print your own parts rather than buying a kit. You can’t buy a Reform computer yet. But developer Lukas Hartmann and designer Ana Dantes have developed a prototype and are soliciting feedback on the concept.
  • New neural network teaches itself Go, spanks the pros
    While artificial intelligence software has made huge strides recently, in many cases, it has only been automating things that humans already do well. If you want an AI to identify the Higgs boson in a spray of particles, for example, you have to train it on collisions that humans have already identified as containing a Higgs. If you want it to identify pictures of cats, you have to train it on a database of photos in which the cats have already been identified.