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Original Articles from 2007

  1. Why Dolphin should have tabs* - Dec 30, 2007
  2. Turkey's Pardus distro is easy to use - Dec 12, 2007
  3. How to use the nvidia driver with the KDE Four Live CD* - Dec 12, 2007
  4. Paldo melds source-based and binary in one distro - Dec 11, 2007
  5. First look at Geubuntu 7.10 - Dec 10, 2007
  6. First look at Linux Mint 4.0 - Nov 26, 2007
  7. Gosh, gOS is good - Nov 16, 2007
  8. DSL 4.0: Damn small improvement - Nov 13, 2007
  9. ubuntu vs opensuse - Nov 12, 2007
  10. First look at Ubuntu Studio 7.10 - Nov 05, 2007
  11. From a PCLOS user: Kubuntu Gutsy doesn't totally reek* - Nov 3, 2007
  12. Hans Reiser: Did He or Didn't He? - Nov 03, 2007
  13. Vixta: Nice concept, incomplete execution - Oct 26, 2007
  14. "Why Ubuntu (Still) Sucks"...Why care?* - Oct 24, 2007
  15. Linux Projects' Best Kept Secret - Oct 20, 2007
  16. Battle of the Titans: Mandriva 2008 vs openSUSE 10.3 - Oct 19, 2007
  17. Wine is Getting Good* - Oct 16, 2007
  18. diff Power_Pack Free - Oct 16, 2007
  19. Mandriva 2008.0 Rocks - Oct 12, 2007
  20. openSUSE 10.3 in review: A solid Linux desktop* - Oct 12, 2007
  21. Quick Look at Ubuntu 7.10 Release Candidate - Oct 12, 2007
  22. First look at Puppy Linux 3.00 - Oct 08, 2007
  23. First look at PC-BSD 1.4 - Oct 01, 2007
  24. openSUSE 10.3 RC 1 Report - Sep 26, 2007
  25. Kind of fond of FaunOS - Sep 25, 2007
  26. KateOS - Getting Better with Age - Sep 19, 2007
  27. ALT: Linux from Russia - Sep 17, 2007
  28. openSUSE 10.3 Beta 3 Report - Sep 10, 2007
  29. Beta Review: Kanotix 2007 "Thorhammer" RC5B* Sep 7, 2007
  30. openSUSE 10.3 Beta (1 &) 2 Report - Aug 26, 2007
  31. Sidux 2007-03.1 "Gaia": A closer look* - Aug 23, 2007
  32. Sidux 2007-03 'Gaia' -- a quick look* - Aug 22, 2007
  33. Freespire aspires, but fails to inspire - Aug 20, 2007
  34. Sabayon Linux: Something for everyone - Aug 14, 2007
  35. Mandriva 2008 Beta 1, "Cassini" -- A few thoughts* -- Aug 11, 2007
  36. Absolute Linux is an absolute winner - Aug 07, 2007
  37. Wolvix 1.1.0 Mini-Review & Screenshots - Aug 06, 2007
  38. openSUSE 10.3 Alpha 7 report - Aug 04, 2007
  39. Mini-Review: Puppy Linux 2.17 - July 23, 2007
  40. openSUSE 10.3 Alpha 6 Report - July 20, 2007
  41. With new code base, Supergamer is fun again - July 18, 2007
  42. Mini-Reviews: CentOS 5.0 LiveCD, Berry 0.82, and AntiX "Spartacus" - July 16, 2007
  43. Venerable Slackware 12 gets a sporty new wardrobe - July 10, 2007
  44. First look at Elive 1.0 - July 09, 2007
  45. Slackware 12: The anti-'buntu* - July 08, 2007
  46. A sysadmin toolbox for Web site maintenance - July 5, 2007
  47. Mini Review of a Tiny PCLOS - July 2, 2007
  48. Yoper 3.0 requires some tinkering - June 28, 2007
  49. New AntiX distro makes older hardware usable - June 26, 2007
  50. OpenSUSE 10.3 Alpha 5 report - June 20, 2007
  51. Alternative GUIs: GoblinX* - June 16, 2007
  52. Granular Linux - What Am I Missing? - June 11, 2007
  53. Alternative GUIs: SymphonyOS* - Jun 9, 2007
  54. Sidux vs. Mint: Can You Live the Pure Open Source Life? - June 4, 2007
  55. Fedora 7 "Moonshine": Freedom vs. Ease-of-Use* - Jun 1, 2007
  56. How-to Edit Grub - May 26, 2007
  57. New PCLinuxOS 2007 looks great, works well - May 23, 2007
  58. VectorLinux SOHO: A better Slackware than Slackware - May 21, 2007
  59. DeLi Linux 0.7.2, a distribution for very old computers - May 21, 2007
  60. openSUSE 10.3 alpha 4 report - May 18, 2007
  61. Ubuntu Studio 7.04 - The Crowning Jewel of the Ubuntu Family - May 12, 2007
  62. Mandriva Spring - Beautiful Change of Season - Apr 30, 2007
  63. Blue Belle: Running PCLinuxOS Test 4* - Apr 28, 2007
  64. Linux Minty Fresh - Apr 24, 2007
  65. Fallen Under the Spell of Arch Voodoo - Apr 20, 2007
  66. openSUSE 10.3 alpha 3 Report - Apr 13, 2007
  67. Quick Little Tour of Opera's New Speed Dial - Apr 11, 2007
  68. GoblinX Premium 2007.1 - Apr 10, 2007
  69. Review of Kubuntu 7.04 Beta* - Apr 07, 2007
  70. Linux Mint "Bianca" KDE Edition Beta 020: A Small Review* - Apr 06, 2007
  71. SimplyMepis 6.5 - Simply Wonderful - Apr 05, 2007
  72. PCLinuxOS becomes PCUbuntuOS - Apr 1, 2007
  73. The Lazy Guide to Installing Knoppix on a USB Key* - Mar 28, 2007
  74. SabayonLinux 3.3 Mini on that HP Laptop - Mar 27, 2007
  75. Sam Linux 2007 - For the XFCE Lover - Mar 23, 2007
  76. A New Year, A New Kwort - Mar 21, 2007
  77. A New Open Source Model? - Mar 19, 2007
  78. openSUSE 10.3 alpha 2 report - Mar 17, 2007
  79. Peeking in the Windows of ReactOS 0.3.1 - Mar 14, 2007
  80. Kicking the tires of Mandriva 2007.1 beta 2 - Mar 04, 2007
  81. Quick Cruise Around Fedora 7 Test 2 - Mar 02, 2007
  82. Testdriving Sidux 2007 - Feb 28, 2007
  83. First look at VectorLinux 5.8 SOHO - Feb 27, 2007
  84. Script KATE to Automagically Compile/Execute Programs* - Feb 25, 2007
  85. openSUSE 10.3 alpha 1 Report - Feb 19, 2007
  86. SaxenOS and SimplyMEPIS - bumps in the middle of the road - Feb 19, 2007
  87. Year of the Linux desktop? Who cares!* - Feb 4, 2007
  88. SaxenOS 1.1 rc2 - Feb 4, 2007
  89. 10 reasons to try PCLinuxOS* - Jan 25, 2007
  90. PCLinuxOS 2007 Beta 2 (Test 1) - Jan 20, 2007
  91. NimbleX 2007 - As the Name Implies... - Jan 16, 2007
  92. SabayonLinux 3.26 on my HP Pavilion Laptop - Jan 11, 2007
  93. TestDriving SimplyMepis 6.0-4 Beta 2 - Jan 7, 2007

* : By others.









More in Tux Machines

KDE and GNOME: KDE 18.08, Usability & Productivity and More

  • KDE Team Announces Major Improvements in Upcoming KDE 18.08 Release
    The developers of Linux’s KDE suite have announced a major slew of updates set to be included in the upcoming KDE 18.08, set for an August 2018 release. Details for these updates revolve around a range of new features and overall polish for the core KDE apps including Gwenview, Spectacle, Konsole, and Dolphin, as well as focusing on the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.14 update due in October. Due to KDE’s open-source nature, the devs also have a site up for people interested in getting involved, whether its simple bug reporting or actually being hands-on with the development using C++, Qt, and CMake. You can read more about their community program at KDE – Get Involved.
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 28
    Here’s another big week for KDE’s Usability and Productivity initiative. We’re getting ready for the release of KDE Applications 18.08–the second of our three yearly Applications releases. As the numbers in the version suggest, it will be released in August of 2018, about a month from now. As such, there’s been a lot of focus on new features and polish for core KDE apps such as Dolphin, Gwenview, Konsole, and Spectacle. We’re also ramping up our work for KDE Plasma 5.14, which is scheduled for release in October.
  • I’ve built a box
    This is not the typical post I use to write (which is usually about what I do at work, often related to GNOME, so if you’re not interested, just skip it…). But a couple of months ago I did something different that I still want to write about. That thing was a wooden box (sorry if you were expecting a Gavin Box) that I was asked to carve by my brother for his wedding, to be used for carrying the wedding rings. The wedding had a Game of Thrones’s theme (there was not blood in it though, if you’re wondering), so naturally my brother wanted some of that in the box. Thus, my initial idea was to just buy a box and carve something to do with GoT and include their names. Something like this, as my brother sent me for inspiration.
  • Bastian Ilsø Hougaard: GUADEC18 Developer Center BoF Part 3: Challenges
    Currently, the Developer Center infrastructure and documentation suffers from low to non-existing maintenance. It’s a sign we need to take serious. Do we need lower the barrier to contributing to the developer documentation? What can we do to make the infrastructure easier to maintain? The underlying issue here likely also ties into why we now see new GNOME documentation hosted on other websites by different maintainers powered by different underlying technologies. I think this challenge needs both thinking from a technical point of view (how we might support editing multi-language documentation and auto-generated documentation) and an organizational point of view (assigning maintainership, reviewing our docs, aligning visions).

Programming: Persepolis, Microsoft EEE, Apache Subversion 1.10.2, SPAKE2 In Golang, AMD AOCC 1.2.1

  • Persepolis Download Manager: Impressive Python frontend for aria2
    Persepolis Download Manager is a handy open source download manager written in Python and PyQt. It’s a graphical frontend for aria2 aiming to make downloads both easier and faster. This software project commenced development in 2015 with the first release in July 2016. While it was initially only a simple graphical user interface, the software has seen some pretty hefty development since then with a whole raft of additional functionality added, improvements to the user interface, and cross-platform support.
  • Microsoft Visual Studio Code replumbed for better Python taming [Ed: Embrace and extend. Microsoft is trying to push developers of FOSS over to their proprietary IDE that puts spying inside compiled code.]
  • What’s new in Apache Subversion 1.10.2?
    I couldn’t believe if you are unaware of the Apache Subversion. It is an Enterprise-class centralized version control founded in 2000 by CollabNet Inc. One of the most successful opensource project in past many years. Mostly all the opensource projects and enterprise source code are on subversion. It has the rich community of developers and users who are continuously improving subversion.
  • SPAKE2 In Golang: Journey to Cryptoland begins
    Before I can go to detail I should tell why/how I came to implementing SPAKE2 in Golang. Story starts a couple of month back when I started contributing to *magic-wormhole.rs*, a Rust port of original Python project of magic-wormhole. You can read this LWN article to understand more about what magic-wormhole is. During contribution my friend Ramakrishnan Muthukrishnan said to me that I should try to port the magic-wormhole to Golang. I was not a expert Go programmer but had understanding of language basics and thought why not use it to improve my language understanding. And this is where it all started.
  • AMD AOCC 1.2.1 Compiler Flings Flang Fixes
    AMD released a minor update to their AMD Optimizing C/C++ Compiler. AOCC is the company's downstream of LLVM/Clang with optimizations for their Zen CPU microarchitecture with compiler optimizations/improvements before they work their way into upstream LLVM. AOCC is the replacement for AMD's Open64 compiler used years ago with earlier micro-architectures.

Exclusive: Why open source is critical to software development

Recently I had the opportunity to sit down with Pivotal APJ head of platform architecture Lawrence Crowther and discuss the importance of Open-source and cloud. Firstly, can you tell me a bit more about Pivotal and its cloud platform? Pivotal’s original mission was to transform the way the world builds software. Now our mission is to transform the way the world runs software, too, through a combination of methodology and technology. Whether we are helping clients change their culture towards product development or managing platforms, we use the same agile principles in both cases, such as Extreme Programming and the Lean Startup approach. This is often a radical shift for companies to embrace so we partner with them for a “learn by doing” approach. We believe that in order to support a fast development team who are iterating quickly and updating constantly, you need a different kind of platform. One that removes all barriers and lets you go from “concept to cash” quickly in a reliable, secure and safe way. You can build software as fast as you want but if it is not ending up in the hands of users it doesn't matter. Once Pivotal Cloud Foundry is up and running the cost of deploying applications and iterating on them becomes almost zero. This is because it takes away the details of infrastructure, middleware, dependencies, integrations, monitoring and more from the development team so they can focus on delivering value to the business over and over again. Read more

Linux 4.18 RC6 is Out

  • Linux 4.18-rc6
    So this was the week when the other shoe dropped ... The reason the two previous rc releases were so nice and small was that David hadn't sent me much networking fixes, and they came in this week. That said, it's not really a huge rc this week either, so it's all good. But the networking pull this week does mean that almost exactly half of the diff is core networking, network drivers, or networking documentation updates. The rest is other drivers (mostly gpu, but also scsi, nvma, pci, pinctrl..), some arch updates (arc, x86, nds32, powerpc), and "misc" (tooling, header files, some vm and fs noise). The small but nasty VM bug we had earlier did indeed get fixed last rc, but there was some 32-bit fallout from the fix, so rc5 still had issues. But I'm hopeful that rc6 _really_ fixed all the cases. Shortlog appended for people who want to just get an overview of the details, Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc6 Kernel Released With Many Networking Fixes, Other Regressions Resolved
    The sixth weekly test release of the Linux 4.18 kernel is now available for evaluation. Linux 4.18-rc6 is prior than the two previous weekly release candidates since those versions hadn't incorporated any big batch of networking fixes, which hit this week. So about half of the changes are networking changes in Linux 4.18-rc6 while the other half is a mix of driver and architecture updates along with other noise.