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Original Articles from 2007

  1. Why Dolphin should have tabs* - Dec 30, 2007
  2. Turkey's Pardus distro is easy to use - Dec 12, 2007
  3. How to use the nvidia driver with the KDE Four Live CD* - Dec 12, 2007
  4. Paldo melds source-based and binary in one distro - Dec 11, 2007
  5. First look at Geubuntu 7.10 - Dec 10, 2007
  6. First look at Linux Mint 4.0 - Nov 26, 2007
  7. Gosh, gOS is good - Nov 16, 2007
  8. DSL 4.0: Damn small improvement - Nov 13, 2007
  9. ubuntu vs opensuse - Nov 12, 2007
  10. First look at Ubuntu Studio 7.10 - Nov 05, 2007
  11. From a PCLOS user: Kubuntu Gutsy doesn't totally reek* - Nov 3, 2007
  12. Hans Reiser: Did He or Didn't He? - Nov 03, 2007
  13. Vixta: Nice concept, incomplete execution - Oct 26, 2007
  14. "Why Ubuntu (Still) Sucks"...Why care?* - Oct 24, 2007
  15. Linux Projects' Best Kept Secret - Oct 20, 2007
  16. Battle of the Titans: Mandriva 2008 vs openSUSE 10.3 - Oct 19, 2007
  17. Wine is Getting Good* - Oct 16, 2007
  18. diff Power_Pack Free - Oct 16, 2007
  19. Mandriva 2008.0 Rocks - Oct 12, 2007
  20. openSUSE 10.3 in review: A solid Linux desktop* - Oct 12, 2007
  21. Quick Look at Ubuntu 7.10 Release Candidate - Oct 12, 2007
  22. First look at Puppy Linux 3.00 - Oct 08, 2007
  23. First look at PC-BSD 1.4 - Oct 01, 2007
  24. openSUSE 10.3 RC 1 Report - Sep 26, 2007
  25. Kind of fond of FaunOS - Sep 25, 2007
  26. KateOS - Getting Better with Age - Sep 19, 2007
  27. ALT: Linux from Russia - Sep 17, 2007
  28. openSUSE 10.3 Beta 3 Report - Sep 10, 2007
  29. Beta Review: Kanotix 2007 "Thorhammer" RC5B* Sep 7, 2007
  30. openSUSE 10.3 Beta (1 &) 2 Report - Aug 26, 2007
  31. Sidux 2007-03.1 "Gaia": A closer look* - Aug 23, 2007
  32. Sidux 2007-03 'Gaia' -- a quick look* - Aug 22, 2007
  33. Freespire aspires, but fails to inspire - Aug 20, 2007
  34. Sabayon Linux: Something for everyone - Aug 14, 2007
  35. Mandriva 2008 Beta 1, "Cassini" -- A few thoughts* -- Aug 11, 2007
  36. Absolute Linux is an absolute winner - Aug 07, 2007
  37. Wolvix 1.1.0 Mini-Review & Screenshots - Aug 06, 2007
  38. openSUSE 10.3 Alpha 7 report - Aug 04, 2007
  39. Mini-Review: Puppy Linux 2.17 - July 23, 2007
  40. openSUSE 10.3 Alpha 6 Report - July 20, 2007
  41. With new code base, Supergamer is fun again - July 18, 2007
  42. Mini-Reviews: CentOS 5.0 LiveCD, Berry 0.82, and AntiX "Spartacus" - July 16, 2007
  43. Venerable Slackware 12 gets a sporty new wardrobe - July 10, 2007
  44. First look at Elive 1.0 - July 09, 2007
  45. Slackware 12: The anti-'buntu* - July 08, 2007
  46. A sysadmin toolbox for Web site maintenance - July 5, 2007
  47. Mini Review of a Tiny PCLOS - July 2, 2007
  48. Yoper 3.0 requires some tinkering - June 28, 2007
  49. New AntiX distro makes older hardware usable - June 26, 2007
  50. OpenSUSE 10.3 Alpha 5 report - June 20, 2007
  51. Alternative GUIs: GoblinX* - June 16, 2007
  52. Granular Linux - What Am I Missing? - June 11, 2007
  53. Alternative GUIs: SymphonyOS* - Jun 9, 2007
  54. Sidux vs. Mint: Can You Live the Pure Open Source Life? - June 4, 2007
  55. Fedora 7 "Moonshine": Freedom vs. Ease-of-Use* - Jun 1, 2007
  56. How-to Edit Grub - May 26, 2007
  57. New PCLinuxOS 2007 looks great, works well - May 23, 2007
  58. VectorLinux SOHO: A better Slackware than Slackware - May 21, 2007
  59. DeLi Linux 0.7.2, a distribution for very old computers - May 21, 2007
  60. openSUSE 10.3 alpha 4 report - May 18, 2007
  61. Ubuntu Studio 7.04 - The Crowning Jewel of the Ubuntu Family - May 12, 2007
  62. Mandriva Spring - Beautiful Change of Season - Apr 30, 2007
  63. Blue Belle: Running PCLinuxOS Test 4* - Apr 28, 2007
  64. Linux Minty Fresh - Apr 24, 2007
  65. Fallen Under the Spell of Arch Voodoo - Apr 20, 2007
  66. openSUSE 10.3 alpha 3 Report - Apr 13, 2007
  67. Quick Little Tour of Opera's New Speed Dial - Apr 11, 2007
  68. GoblinX Premium 2007.1 - Apr 10, 2007
  69. Review of Kubuntu 7.04 Beta* - Apr 07, 2007
  70. Linux Mint "Bianca" KDE Edition Beta 020: A Small Review* - Apr 06, 2007
  71. SimplyMepis 6.5 - Simply Wonderful - Apr 05, 2007
  72. PCLinuxOS becomes PCUbuntuOS - Apr 1, 2007
  73. The Lazy Guide to Installing Knoppix on a USB Key* - Mar 28, 2007
  74. SabayonLinux 3.3 Mini on that HP Laptop - Mar 27, 2007
  75. Sam Linux 2007 - For the XFCE Lover - Mar 23, 2007
  76. A New Year, A New Kwort - Mar 21, 2007
  77. A New Open Source Model? - Mar 19, 2007
  78. openSUSE 10.3 alpha 2 report - Mar 17, 2007
  79. Peeking in the Windows of ReactOS 0.3.1 - Mar 14, 2007
  80. Kicking the tires of Mandriva 2007.1 beta 2 - Mar 04, 2007
  81. Quick Cruise Around Fedora 7 Test 2 - Mar 02, 2007
  82. Testdriving Sidux 2007 - Feb 28, 2007
  83. First look at VectorLinux 5.8 SOHO - Feb 27, 2007
  84. Script KATE to Automagically Compile/Execute Programs* - Feb 25, 2007
  85. openSUSE 10.3 alpha 1 Report - Feb 19, 2007
  86. SaxenOS and SimplyMEPIS - bumps in the middle of the road - Feb 19, 2007
  87. Year of the Linux desktop? Who cares!* - Feb 4, 2007
  88. SaxenOS 1.1 rc2 - Feb 4, 2007
  89. 10 reasons to try PCLinuxOS* - Jan 25, 2007
  90. PCLinuxOS 2007 Beta 2 (Test 1) - Jan 20, 2007
  91. NimbleX 2007 - As the Name Implies... - Jan 16, 2007
  92. SabayonLinux 3.26 on my HP Pavilion Laptop - Jan 11, 2007
  93. TestDriving SimplyMepis 6.0-4 Beta 2 - Jan 7, 2007

* : By others.









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Software: Virtlyst 1.2.0, Blender 2.8 Plan, Dropbox Gets Worse and DaVinci Resolve 15 Targets GNU/Linux

  • Virtlyst 1.2.0 released
    Virtlyst – a Web Interface to manage virtual machines build with Cutelyst/Qt/C++ got a new release. This new release includes a bunch of bug fixes, most importantly probably being the ability to warn user before doing important actions to help avoid doing mistakes. Most commits came from new contributor René Linder who is also working on a Bootstrap 4 theme and Lukas Steiner created a dockerfile for it. This is especially cool because Virtlyst repository now has 4 authors while Cutelyst which is way older has only 6.
  • Blender 2.8 Planning Update
    At this point we will not have a feature complete Beta release ready in August as we had hoped. Instead, we invested most of our time improving the features that were already there and catching up with the bug tracker. This includes making the viewport and EEVEE work on more graphics cards and platforms. The Spring open movie team is also using Blender 2.8 in production, which is helping us ensure the new dependency graph and tools can handle complex production scenes.
  • Blender 2.80 Now Coming In Early 2019 With Many Improvements
    The Blender 3D modeling software is facing a slight set-back in their release schedule for the big Blender 2.80 release, but it's moving along and they intend to have it ready by early next year.
  • Dropbox will only Support the Ext4 File System In Linux in November
    Dropbox has announced that starting on November 7th 2018, only the ext4 file system will be supported in Linux for synchronizing folders in the Dropbox desktop app. Those Linux users who have synch on other file systems such as XFS, ext2, ext3, ZFS, and many others will no longer have working Dropbox synchronization after this date. This news came out after Linux dropbox users began seeing notifications stating "Dropbox Will Stop Syncing Ext4 File Systems in November." You can see an example of this alert in Swedish below.
  • Dropbox scares users by shrinking synching options
    Dropbox has quietly announced it will soon stop synching files that reside on drives tended by some filesystems. The sync ‘n’ share service’s desktop client has recently produced warnings that the software will stop syncing in November 2018. Those warnings were sufficiently ambiguous that Dropbox took to its support forums to explain exactly what’s going on, namely that as of November 7th, 2018, “we’re ending support for Dropbox syncing to drives with certain uncommon file systems.”
  • DaVinci Resolve 15 Video/Effects Editor Released With Linux Support
    DaVinci Resolve 15 has been released by Blackmagic Design as the company's professional-grade video editing, visual effects, motion graphics, and audio post-production software.

How to display data in a human-friendly way on Linux

Not everyone thinks in binary or wants to mentally insert commas into large numbers to come to grips with the sizes of their files. So, it's not surprising that Linux commands have evolved over several decades to incorporate more human-friendly ways of displaying information to its users. In today’s post, we look at some of the options provided by various commands that make digesting data just a little easier. Read more