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The Worst Linux Distro of 2007

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Linux

Another year has passed in the Open Source Community and there has been many Successes. The release of the great new looking Debian, the sold out release of the eeePC and everex, and a top 100 award for Ubuntu 7.04. However just like their competitors they have had some failures in 2007. In this review I shall pick my top 2 (out of the 23 tested) worst Linux Distros for 2007.

Runner Up: Fedora 7

The Fedora linux project’s main aim is to be at the rapid forefront of Open Source. However with the release of Fedora 7 in May 31 2007, and version 8 only 6 months and 7 days later was there a real need for Version 7? If you take a look at the Microsoft world, they took 6 years between OS’s, and Mac took 3 years. So how much can an OS grow in 7 months?

More Here




Update on the Kubuntu issue

Thanks srlinuxx for the post (you are fantastic), atang1 for the great comment, and all the commentators (people who left comments) and viewers on my site.

Just in regards to Kubuntu issue.
The constants are:
- the internet connection
- 3 different eeePC's
- and the Kubuntu for eeePC cd from November 2007 (as the review was for 07)

When you are on youtube! and don't stop or pause a flash video before changing the page (e.g. new site, back or forward) then the browser just locks up and you have kill it and reopen the whole browser. However if you have 1 paused youtube open in any tab, you wont have the issue.

However, when using the standard Xandros from AsusTek, it doesn't freeze up at all (no matter when you move away from the video).

Conclusion:
This issue seems to be Kubuntu based (even if it is ISP lag, the OS should handle it...just like Xandros can). So it's a shame with their very high standard that the Ubuntu/Kubuntu developers didn't pick it up before release.

Also, atang1 some good points raised in regards to development, so anyone interested don't forget to help out your distro in 2008.

Thanks all Smile

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