Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Interview with Tristan Nitot, President, Mozilla Europe

Filed under
Interviews
Moz/FF

Q: This is Sean Daly reporting for Groklaw. I'm at FOSDEM 1 in Brussels, and I'm seated here with Tristan Nitot who is president of Mozilla Europe. Thank you very much for being with us today.

Tristan Nitot: Oh, it's a pleasure.

Q: I would like to ask you a few questions. First of all, could you tell me how many Mozilla developers are here in Brussels this weekend?

Tristan Nitot: It depends what you call a developer. I would rather say contributor. We're, I think, pretty close to a hundred.

Q: A hundred? Now, let me ask you another question: What do 100 Mozilla contributors do together in a room?

Tristan Nitot: Well, we communicate. We socialize. You know, we collaborate on a daily basis using electronic means; we use Bugzilla, we use IRC, we use e-mail. But nothing replaces the bandwidth of, you know, human interaction and face-to-face. And nothing replaces the fact that you share a beer with someone you've been maybe fighting a bit over time on such-and-such feature that was not included or was, you know -- you don't always agree when you work together, and especially it's easy to fight on e-mail or stuff like that, but when you're facing the person and you say, "OK, let me buy you a beer", and suddenly things go smoother again. So it's very important to meet in person.

Q: Well, Brussels is certainly one of the finest places to find a beer to work out differences with anybody. [laughter] Now, I saw that Firefox 3 Beta 1 is out. Can you tell us what's coming up in Firefox 3?

More Here




Anti-Ajax/LAMP blob

Mind the bit where he talks about Silverlight, anti-Ajax/LAMP blob. Reject it, reject it, reject it. For the future of FOSS.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

UBUNTU 14.10 AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

Ubuntu 14.10 is now available for download. This release doesn't ship with any new Unity features and it includes mostly bug fixes. Still, there are some under the hood changes and of course, updated applications. Read more

Feeling Scammed After Anonabox? Android-Based Project Sierra Claims To Be The Real Deal

In the wake of former NSA contractor Edward Snowden's big reveal on government spying, there's been a concerted effort by companies big and small to try and make our lives truly private. One seemingly promising solution was Anonabox, a little plug-and-play device that routes traffic through Tor to keep our online activities anonymous. Unfortunately, we were all misled on a number of levels, prompting Kickstarter to remove the project forever. Hot on its heels is Project Sierra, a network encryption device that's supposedly the real deal. Read more

These 12 agencies embraced open source. Why?

Why do government agencies turn to open source software? FutureGov has interviewed 12 senior officials to find out.

Australia’s Chief Technology Officer, John Sheridan, has moved his country’s citizen-facing portal onto open source software, and is offering to help agencies migrate too. “Open source licence arrangements enable the development of some sort of public good, where people contribute or benefit from it,” he says.

Other agencies clearly agree. Hong Kong’s Office of the GCIO is notably enthusiastic, with Victor Lam telling FutureGov that “We recognise the fact that it is the kind of technology [where] we need to be ahead of the curve”.

What was their experience of migrating to open source, and how does it match with others?

Read more

ARM vs. Intel: Why chipmakers want your Chromebook’s brains

Case in point: Samsung's new Chromebook 2, announced Friday, which has Intel's Bay Trail M Celeron N2840—not one of Samsung’s own Exynos dual-core ARM chips. Earlier Chromebook 2 versions shipped with ARM processors and will continue to do so, but in a briefing with PCWorld, Samsung product manager David Ng said Chromebooks are quickly trending toward Intel components. "More than 50% of Chromebooks sold these days have Intel processors," Ng said. Read more Also: Chromebook Sales Jump 67 Percent In Last Three Months