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Drupal Founder Dries Buytaert Balances Community And Company Interest

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Drupal

In the year 2000, Dries Buytaert created Drupal, a freely licensed and open source tool to manage websites, as a bulletin board for his college dorm. Since Dries released the software and a community of thousands of volunteer developers have added and improved modules, Drupal has grown immensely popular. Drupal won the overall Open CMS Award in 2007, and some speakers in Drupal's spacious developer's room at FOSDEM 2008 were dreaming aloud of its world domination.

Buytaert (now 29) just finished his doctoral thesis and has founded the start-up Acquia. The new company wants to become Drupal's best friend, with the help of an all-star team and US$7 million collected from venture capitalists. Wikinews reporter Michaël Laurent sat down with Dries in Brussels to discuss these recent exciting developments.

On FOSDEM

Wikinews: How important is an event like FOSDEM for yourself and for the Drupal community?

Dries Buytaert: I think it's more important for the Drupal community than for me personally. It is important because we work together day and night through mailing lists, fora etc., and when you meet each other face-to-face you can understand one and another better, it gives more depth to your relationship. It's also important as a forum were many ideas can be discussed in a shorter time. With the growth of Drupal, the community has grown, and even for me it has become impossible to follow all communication, all forum posts etc. So it is also a way to filter new ideas.

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