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M$ To Clone Open Source

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Microsoft

If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, developer of the open source fire transfer tool rsync, Andrew 'Tridge' Tridgell has every reason to smile as Microsoft announced a similar utility will feature in the next Windows server release.

Speaking at this year's TechEd conference on the Gold Coast on Wednesday, Redmond-based Windows Server group director Iain McDonald said the next update of Windows Server 2003, dubbed "R2", will reduce bandwidth for file transfers for organizations with many branch offices.

"There is new functionality we wanted to be able to provide to you in R2," McDonald said. "First of all there is a bunch of stuff for branches. In the US there are new regulations about what [organizations] have to do on branches, what they have to keep around over longer terms. We had a look at that and in discussions we knew one of the big things was 'let's minimize the amount of bandwidth that stuff takes to get into a central location'."

To achieve this, Microsoft will introduce DFSR, or Distributed File System Replication, with R2, which is due for release later this year.

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