Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

PCs for Five C's

Filed under
Hardware

Of course a $500 price tag isn't unprecedented. For a couple of years or more, retail superstores have offered consumers $500 desktops suitable for use as a family's second or third PC. These days, several vendors stock $199 Linux systems ready to be the family's fifth or sixth.

But can half a grand buy a PC you'll feed good about buying? The first item on our checklist and/or wish list was a dual-core processor -- and believe us, if you weren't familiar with the 65-nanometer-process, entry-level Pentium Dual-Core chip that Intel quietly slipped into its lineup below the Core 2 Duo last year, you will be after five minutes shopping for $500 PCs.

We also kept an eye out for PCI Express x16 slots to allow upgrading from low-priced desktops' integrated graphics, and -- hardest to find in this price range -- 2GB instead of 1GB of memory, to shift Windows Vista from Park to Drive. Unless otherwise mentioned, every system we eyed came with a DVD±RW burner, with WiFi standard equipment on laptops.

Then we took a $500 bill from our wallet -- a neat trick; William McKinley's picture hasn't been printed on U.S. currency since 1945 -- and set off on our virtual shopping spree. As in previous Web-site surveys, any errors in transcription are our fault; any price or configuration changes since Monday and Tuesday, February 25 and 26, are the vendors'.

More Here




Also: Building a Gaming Computer is Easy!

More in Tux Machines

Xubuntu 15.10 Beta 1 Drops Gnumeric and Abiword in Favor of LibreOffice Writer and Calc

Canonical has announced the release of the first Beta build for Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) opt-in flavors, which include the well-known Xubuntu distribution built around the lightweight Xfce desktop environment. Read more

Technology, the law and you: Open-source software

But “free as in beer” isn’t really the point – huge numbers of corporate open-source users opt for paid commercial versions of open-source projects, for simplicity and support. And then there are all those various licenses that protect the openness of the software – GPL, Apache, Eclipse. But the good news is that, with very few exceptions, there aren’t many legal issues for the average company to worry about. Read more

Today in Techrights

Windows 10: is it finally time to migrate to Ubuntu?

Ubuntu continues to grow in popularity, not only with mainstream consumers, but also with Fortune 500 companies. Moreover, government and top notch education entities across the globe have realized they can save millions of USD, and invest funds more prudently for social programmes. Read more