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Installing Wolvix Linux - Full tutorial

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Linux
HowTos

We all know that Slackware means stability and security. But Slackware has never been a distribution for the weak and elderly. It has always been regarded as one of the more geeky and difficult distros, alongside Gentoo. Until now. Well, Gentoo got Sabayon and Slackware got Wolvix.

Wolvix is a Slackware-based live CD distribution, with the GUI installer for those who please to have Wolvix on their machine. But more than just introducing a fully functional live session equipped with tons of great programs, which allows you to familiarize with the distro and - more importantly - test the hardware compatibility, Wolvix delivers a whole new concept to the Slackware world - simplicity and friendliness toward regular users.

Wolvix will boot into a live session and allow you to play around. It will also let you install the system in just a few steps, all through a friendly graphical wizard. You will need not see the command line ever once. Everything is automated, fast and simple.

Sounds incredible, doesn't it? Words 'simple' and 'Slackware' in the same sentence! I had to share this most pleasant surprise with everyone. Hence, this guide.

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