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Asianux 2.0 Reviewed

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I have to admit it; I was one of those people who were caught up in the hype of the highly anticipated Asianux 2.0 release. The whole situation reminds of sitting in front of the TV seeing clips from a self proclaimed 'hottest movie of the summer', then when actually seeing the movie, realizing that those clips where the only interesting 2 minutes of the movie. DistroWatch recently slammed Asianux, but is it really that bad? I just had to find out. I offer another perspective of a release that will remain in the headlines for awhile.

Full Review.

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