Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

My thoughts on Slackware 12.0

Filed under
Slack

It seems that the strength of OSS and GNU/Linux in the past was the number of projects that existed. Now that very strength gets in the way of a person searching for the distribution that works for them. Many distributions of GNU/Linux and other operating systems do much of what most people need, but very few do everything that the average user wants their computer to do.

I have used GNU/Linux in one form or another since ’98, but only as a hobbyist. With each release, I relied on proprietary operating systems less and less, finally retaining GNU/Linux as my only operating system in 2005.

With each new operating system I used, there was something that I could not comfortably accomplish. This was very much the case in Windows, and continued to be so with every version of GNU/Linux that I tried. Though with each distribution, the situation would get better and better, it was a matter of deciding what I was able to do without.

I had always avoided Slackware because of its reputation for being very difficult to install and configure. I am not a computer professional, so possess the knowledge of a typical user. I just want things to work.

I decided after a little bit of research to take the plunge.




More in Tux Machines

This Custom Android-x86 Build Puts Android 7.1.1 on Your PC, with Linux 4.11 RC7

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton was happy to announce the release of a new build of his custom built Android-x86 project that lets uses runs the latest Android mobile operating system on their personal computers. Read more

Clear Linux Announces Intel Clear Containers 2.1.6 with Docker 17.04.0 Support

Clear Linux's Kent Helm was proud to announce the release and general availability of Intel Clear Containers 2.1.6, a maintenace update that promises to improve compatibility with recent Docker releases, but also adds various bug fixes. Read more

Nantes Métropole releases open source tool for LibreOffice transition

The French city of Nantes (Nantes Métropole) has released an open source tool used to schedule its migration to LibreOffice. The shift from commercial software to the free and open source LibreOffice productivity suite started in 2013 and is intended to save the administration EUR 260 000 per year. The transition was finalised in April 2016. Read more

Today in Techrights