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Ten Steps Needed for Fiery Desktop Linux Adoption

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With each passing month, I find one article after another claiming to have the magic formula needed for desktop Linux to see significant gains. But to me, this feels a lot like putting the carriage before the horse.

Those with a vested interest in desktop Linux adoption are trying to sell something that still has critical challenges overcome first. Desktop Linux is ready for everyday use, but there are areas that must to be addressed first before seeking any sort of massive mainstream adoption of this in comparison to OS X or Windows. This is a fact backed by bug reports that leave many existing users without any recourse other than to deal with the issues at hand in frustration.

Here’s a list of the areas that I believe are in desperate need of attention. As you read this, bear in mind that I’m a long time desktop Linux user, not another biased Windows-using pundit.

1. Preinstalled desktop Linux. With very few exceptions, most users will find their only support options entail calling someone or if they know to take this action, seeking help from a local Linux user group. And for the more technology savvy, user forums.

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