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Absolute FreeBSD 2nd Edition review

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BSD

There aren't many FreeBSD books on the market -- compared to the number of Linux books, anyway -- so it's important that the few extant titles be superbly written and technically accurate. I was really looking forward to reading Absolute FreeBSD 2nd Edition because I'd heard such great things about the aged first edition. Unfortunately, I found this book to be a spectacular disappointment.

Writing analysis

This is a big, thick book, which makes it a little intimidating, but also offers the promise of in-depth technical information. Most of that space is occupied not by great technical writing, though -- it's consumed by colloquial garbage. The author offers long-winded, meandering, and pointless filler discussion on nearly every imaginable unimportant topic, and retreats into general statements about technical points that border on the inaccurate.

Absolute FreeBSD 2nd Edition is a traditional No Starch book, heavy on "I'm your best pal" conversational speech with little technical substance. Trying to rapidly achieve a high level of understanding about the FreeBSD operating system by reading this book is as frustrating and annoying as trying to get driving directions from someone who wants to describe every road and landmark between here and your destination. You might get there, but you're going to get lost a lot.

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