Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Computers are good for your health

Filed under

A report by Ross Koppel of the University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, told the Journal of the American Medical Association that using computers to prescribe drugs has helped doctors curb dangerous errors caused by messy handwriting and bureaucratic mishaps.

According to CNN, Koppel said that in some cases, fragmented computer displays have resulted in prescription errors, and drug inventory information from the pharmacy were mistaken for dosage guidelines. Sometimes doctors' orders to renew a drug were placed on paper charts but not in the computer system, drugs were incorrectly ordered more than once, incompatible drugs were ordered simultaneously, and the computer system's inflexibility generated its own mistakes.


More in Tux Machines

KDBUS Continues Maturing, But Will We See It For Linux 4.4?

New KDBUS patches continue being published for this in-kernel IPC mechanism based on D-Bus, but it hasn't been communicated yet whether Linux 4.4 is the next target for hoping to mainline this controversial code. Just yesterday was a set of 44 patches in attempting to cleanup the KDBUS code further. There's also been an assortment of other KDBUS patches floating around the kernel mailing list. Read more

Bodhi: Detour and Forum Themes now Moksha Compatible

Today I am happy to announce we have completed work on the first couple of themes we are updating to be compatible with Moksha. Read more

Science on Android

I have covered a lot of different scientific packages that are available under Linux in this space, but the focus has been on Linux running on desktop machines. This has been rather short-sighted, however, as lots of other platforms have Linux available and shouldn't be neglected. So in this article, I start looking at the type of science you can do on the Android platform. For my next several articles, I plan to include occasional Android applications that you may find useful. Read more

Linksys WRT router gains faster SoC, more RAM, OpenWrt

Linksys has launched a “WRT1900ACS” router that updates the AC version with a faster dual-core, 1.6GHz SoC, twice the RAM (at 512MB), and OpenWrt support. In early 2014 when Linksys resurrected the hackable Linksys WRT54G WiFi router in a new WRT1900AC model, the Belkin subsidiary said the the Linux-based router would also support the lightweight, networking-focused OpenWrt Linux distribution. With the new WRT1900ACS, Linksys is making life easier for OpenWrt lovers by providing full, open source OpenWrt support out of the box. Read more