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Ok, confession time. I love webgen but the Geek Ranch site keeps getting more complicated. We want blogs, .... Or, put another way, the dynamic content keeps growing.

I finally gave in and admitted we need Drupal. So, on to installing Drupal 6. No hosting location I work with has it on the auto-installer, so on to manually doing it.
First problem: can't run wget. It's on the shared server but I don't have permission to run it. That's absurd. Why? Because the alternative is to download Drupal to a local machine (which I have done anyway) but then upload it to the server with ftp. As my download bandwidth is eight times my upload bandwidth, I didn't like that solution.

On to Plan B. I uploaded wget to the shared server and compiled it. Small upload, quick compile. One problem down.

Drupal setup. Trivial. Create a database and user and go to the URL. Follow your nose. This is, of course, what you should expect these days but so many otherwise sophisticated web applications require a day or more of dorking around to get them installed and running.

Here is the whole install sequence:

More here




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