Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Getting Stuff Done on Linux [Part 2]

Filed under
Software

Last time, we covered Linux applications for creating content. Today we will be covering organizational and web-based programs for Linux.

The Series of Tubes*

We all use the internet. I’m sure anyone reading this has also heard of Firefox but do you know about all the others? Konqueror is a nice browser based on the KHTML rendering engine, the same great engine Safari and WebKit use, which means it supports a few things (like drop-shadows on text) which no other browsers do. Then there’s Epiphany, which will display pages the same way Firefox does, but which fits the look ‘n feel of GNOME environments a bit better than Firefox 2.0 does (Firefox 3, however, fits very well). There are also lightweight browsers like Kazehakase you might like. Firefox is by far the most extensible, though.

Instant Messaging

Pidgin Logo For text-based instant messaging, nothing beats Pidgin’s flexibility. It can handle AIM, ICQ, IRC, MSN, Yahoo, Gadu-Gadu, QQ, SIMPLE, Bonjour, Novell Groupwise, XMPP and Google Talk (aka Jabber), Zephyr, Sametime, and even MySpaceIM. If you haven’t heard of half of those anywhere else, I’m with you, but from what I’ve heard it seems they are each varyingly popular in different parts of the world. As with OpenOffice, it’s cross-platform (Win, Mac, Linux), so transitioning can be easy. The Mac OSX version is called Adium. If you want to add voice or video chat capability, Skype 2.0 for Linux does have video support (older versions did not).

More Here




More in Tux Machines

With government approval, OpenStack adoption continues apace in China

Deployments of OpenStack cloud are growing faster in China and the APAC region than anywhere else in the world, backed in part by the Chinese government's vocal support for the open source infrastructure. It is China in particular where some of the biggest deployments are running. China UnionPay recently overtook Visa for the largest volume of card payments in the world. The state-operated railway network China Rail oversees billions of passengers every year. By total number of subscribers China Mobile tops the list for biggest mobile phone operator globally. And the massive utility organisation the State Grid Corporation of China employs 1.5 million people. All of these enormous enterprises are running OpenStack clouds. Why? Read more Also:

The Fox Hunt - Firefox and friends compared

So what should you use? Well, it depends. You want extensions, the entire repertoire as it's meant to be? Go with Pale Moon, but be aware of the inconsistencies and problems down the road. However, another piece of penalty is less than optimal looks. If you are more focused on speed and future development, then it's Firefox, as it offers the most complete compromise. The add-ons will make it or break it. Waterfox makes less sense, because the margins of benefit are too small. My take is - Firefox. It's not ideal, but Pale Moon does not solve the problem fully, it combines nostalgia with technicals, and that's a rough patch, even though the project is quite admirable in what it's trying to do. Alas, I'm afraid the old extensions will die, and the new ones won't be compatible, so the browser will be left stranded somewhere in between. But hopefully, this little comparison test gives you a better overview and understanding how things work. Finally, we go back to the question of speed. We've seen how one flavor of Fox stacks against another, but what about Chrome? I will answer that in a follow-up article, which will compare Chrome to Vivaldi, again based on popular demand, and then we will also check how all these different browsers compare using my small, limited and entirely personal corner of the Web. Stay tuned. Read more Also: Firefox Private Browsing vs. Chrome Incognito: Which is Faster?

Tizen News

Android Leftovers