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More Apparent Departures from One Laptop Per Child

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OLPC

I was looking at the Laptop.org site today, bemoaning the loss of Ivan Krstić and Mary Lou Jepsen, my two favorite people at One Laptop Per Child, and I noticed they weren't the only ones removed from the OLPC people page.

Taking a closer look, and comparing it to the archived version, there are four other absences that stand out. Gone from the listing of OLPC's advisors and Board of Directors, are:

1. Mitchel Resnick, MIT, advisors
2. Gary Dillabough, eBay, Board of Directors
3. Joe Jacobson, MIT, Board of Directors
4. Seymour Papert, MIT, Board of Directors (still an advisor)

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