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Kat - Desktop Search Environment Updated

Filed under
KDE
Software

Changelog:

0.6.3
Fixed crash when closing Kat
Fixed indexing of directories when a null regexp was encountered
Fixed bug that prevented any index to be created
Fixed bug preventing directories with non-latin characters to be specified as root folder for a catalog

0.6.3beta2
Fixed katclient double click in list view
Fixed crash in search mode when a user double clicks on a directory
Added lyx fulltext plugin
Disabled Help button
Fixed search dialogbox layout
Reload catalogs when user changes excluded dir / files
Use readPathList to expand macro for example ($HOME) in katdeamon and katcontrol
Fixed mem leak
Syncronized with beagle inotify glut
Fixed compilation with unsermake
Added man fulltext plugin
Added chemical/x-pdb fulltext plugin
Added item in kicker: find menu for kat
Added --searchmode argument
Added DVI fulltext plugin
Allow to use kregexpeditor for editing file exclusion list
Fixed inotify test
Added --wizard argument to launch wizard
Added --onlysystray argument to launch only systray
Fixed mem leak in katclient

Mr. Cappuccio states, "The best part of this project, though, has still to come.

Talking with the developers of Tenor, the context linking environment for KDE, we discovered that Kat could be considered the perfect complement for it, because Kat collects information about the content and metadata of the files.

Therefore we agreed to merge the two project in order to develop a complete search environment (content+context) perfectly and seamlessly integrated in KDE.

In the next releases, you will see a metamorphosis that will completely transform Kat while it gets integrated in KDE.

People don't need a desktop search engine. They need to find what they are searching for. And they will do that without even knowing that they are using Kat."

More here, with download information.

Homepage.

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