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Do we really want or need the crowds of Windows users moving over to Linux?

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Just talk

Was thinking, while trapped on the London Underground this morning, do we really want the massed ranks of Windows users coming over to Linux?

Running through this site, there are numerous posts, but the great enlightened telling me why Linux doesn't cut it, or why Linux isn't ever going to replace windows.. and you know what, I don't think we should really care.

If an individual is unable to circumvent thier issues, and use the resources available to them to resolve an issue, then that's good, and I hope they enjoy using their Windows OS. If Linux doesn't supply that same group of users with the application they are used to using in XP, then this too is also fine.

I'm sort of at a bit of a loss, as to why we need to emulate the Windows environment. for those of us who have managed to move our daily lives over to Linux, probably via numerous distros, i think i'm safe in saying, we are happy where we are at.

You see the neighsayers are missing the basic point of Linux, no one has ever gone on record stating that it all works, no one has ever charged you money with the claim it all works. We know it doesn't work 100%, we know some vendors don't seem to realise the huge market there is in the linux arena, so don't bother writing drivers for thier hardware..

We however, get on and use this OS, for the simple reason, if we wish to change it, we can. We do have a say. and it does work.

There are not 10 reason's i should or shouldn't be using Linux, I should be using it because it works, and its the right tool for me. end of.

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In short: Reason 1:

In short:
Reason 1: SPAM
Reason 2: More users == more apps and drivers
Reason 3: Trial by fire

Taken from: Does Linux really want Windows users?

I had an interesting day

I had an interesting day today, about support personnel, I spend my day to day dealing with Encryption software, and Linux. And i deal with "Trained" windows support professionals on a daily basis. It occurred to me oday, that the problem with Windows is, its made people lazy. Most of the people i deal with earn a hight wage than me, have a better job title, however seem to be unable to grasp some of the rudimentary concepts of the worlds most popular OS. I was told today, by a system architect, that Firefox is just a fad which will disappear as quickly as it appeared. These are the people we a a Linux community wish to entice over, the community so ingrained in Windows, they don't even know what they are using half the time. The project i'm working on, is a Linux Thin client, which runs on a USB stick, and boots anywhere. There are two responses to this, with most of the IT industry's professionals. The first is "Can we put VMWare on the stick, and run a Windows system?" and the other is, "I't windows, i know that.." The users Trained IT professionals think they are using XP, because i themed Gnome with an XP theme.. they didn't like the product previously, because it was basd on Linux, now its based on Windows (GnomeXP theme) they love it..

Its really not about them or us, its just an unfortunate case of individuals so firmly entrenched on what they think they know. That even if they do move over to Linux, they will never be really happy..

Oh, and yes, the SPAM.. Oh the SPAM!! Thats system agnostic.

unchained vendors

For the most part hardware vendors have their arms bent around their backs at a very awkward angle by big Bill "the slayer" Gates and co. With the kind of pressure being applied it makes it extremely difficult for movement and developing drivers across a broader range. Vendors won't cut off their noses to spite their face and they know that they dare not bite the hand that feeds them else they be banished from the garden of Redmond for all eternity [evil laugh]Whaaa ha haaaaa[/evil laugh] All hail the balance sheet.

As for people coming over to Linux, the more prominence it gains in the public arena the more people will try it. Obviously there are those type of people that will only order chicken fried rice and curry sauce on every order at the Chinese, they'll taste something else and fall back into the good, ole, comfortable order again... yet a small percentage will stay. There will never be a mass influx of other OS users taking up Linux at this point, just a little at a time. I would probably agree with fieldyweb's points too, if it looks like what they are used to, chicken fried rice syndrome (is that a china crisis? Smile ), they will stay with that which they are comfortable. And the other point is if it is free how can it be any good? – It sort of plays to the sceptical nature of people.

If crowds did migrate then the hardware vendors would have to supply the demand regardless of the arm bending, Redmond banishment treatment, which in reality wouldn't happen. MS can't expel all vendors; this would be like signing its death warrant. Without hardware support the edge is lost. I've seen quite a change over the years in the Linux world and these are interesting times, no one knows what will happen but all distributions just get better and better. Once the snowball rolls I think we'll see an exponential take up and acceptance of Linux.

On your last comment "I've

On your last comment

"I've seen quite a change over the years in the Linux world and these are interesting times, no one knows what will happen but all distributions just get better and better. Once the snowball rolls I think we'll see an exponential take up and acceptance of Linux."

I couldn't agree more, starting out with early versons of Caldara Linux, then Corel Linux, and Redhat 4 to what we have today i an amazing achievement, and proof that sheer force of movement, and choice can provide so much.

And as for the "(is that a china crisis? Smiling " raised a chuckle on an otherwise dull morning..

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