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Epiphany

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Software
Humor

Over the last few months, the Epiphany development team has been discussing the future of the Gnome web browser. We feel that we haven't been living up to the full potential of a well-integrated Gnome application, due to both internal and external constraints.

The Epiphany user interface is built on top of an abstraction layer above the web rendering engine, enabling us to support multiple back-ends. Currently Epiphany supports the Mozilla browser engine (Gecko), and the WebKit engine.

The Epiphany dependency on Gecko creates a number of problems for us. We are a small team, with only one maintainer and a hand-full of regular contributors. Therefore we have decided to radically change the future of Epiphany. We will choose only one web engine back-end to support.

This single back-end will be * WebKit *.

More Here




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