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Ubuntu gets "hardier" with Hary Heron

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Ubuntu

The Beta's still hot out of the oven, and a lot of reviews have appeared throughout the internet describing the numerous improvements, so I'm not going to spend a lot of time talking about them too. I will talk about what the Hardy Heron release can do for Ubuntu.

Being an LTS or enterprise release, it presents a fully viable alternative to Windows on the business front. As a boss you don't want to hear about the new Linux scheduler or about the new burning application, what matters to you is stability, and usability. And that's where the heron is aiming to land. Ubuntu 8.04 is aiming to provide the most stable and usable Linux desktop (and server) ever made, proudly ready for a business environment.

This is where all those features come in, didn't you notice that they were not focused on being cutting-edge but instead on providing a more polished solution ?

Canonical knows this is a very important release, that's why they are being very careful in how to deal with it.

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