Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Free/Open-source Spreadsheet Programs

Filed under
Software

A computer application that replaced paper worksheets is called a spreadsheet. It shows multiple cells that together make up a grid consisting of rows and columns, each cell containing either alphanumeric text or numeric values. A spreadsheet cell may otherwise hold a formula that classifies how the contents of that cell is to be calculated from the contents of any other cell (or combination of cells) each time any cell is updated. Spreadsheets are often used for financial information because of their capacity to re-calculate the entire sheet automatically after an alteration to a single cell.

If you think that the proprietary and expensive Microsoft Excel is the only available and capable spreadsheet software, then think again because you are wrong. There are quite a number of free/open-source spreadsheet programs that are almost as good or even at par with Excel.

Here are some of the most known free/open-source software spreadsheet applications:

More Here




More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

GNU/Linux Desktop Security

  • How to Safely and Securely Back Up Your Linux Workstation
    Even seasoned system administrators can overlook Linux workstation backups or do them in a haphazard, unsafe manner. At a minimum, you should set up encrypted workstation backups to external storage. But it’s also nice to use zero-knowledge backup tools for off-site/cloud backups for more peace of mind. Let’s explore each of these methods in more depth. You can also download the entire set of recommendations as a handy guide and checklist.
  • Google zero-trust security framework goes beyond passwords
    With a sprawling workforce, a wide range of devices running on multiple platforms, and a growing reliance on cloud infrastructure and applications, the idea of the corporate network as the castle and security defenses as walls and moats protecting the perimeter doesn’t really work anymore. Which is why, over the past year, Google has been talking about BeyondCorp, the zero-trust perimeter-less security framework it uses to secure access for its 61,000 employees and their devices.

Leftovers: Gaming

SystemD and Linux (Kernel)

  • systemd ❤ meson
    After hearing good things about meson for a long time, I decided to take the plunge and started working on porting the build system of systemd to meson. In our case "build system" is really a system — 11.5k lines in configure.ac and two Makefile.am s. This undertaking was bigger than I expected. Even though I had the initial patch compiling most of the code after a weekend of work, it took another three weeks and 80 patches [1] to bring it to mergeable state. There are still minor issues outstanding, but the pull request has been merged, so I want to take the opportunity to celebrate and summarize my impressions about meson.
  • Systemd Lands Meson Build System Support
    Systemd can now be built with the Meson build system as an alternative to its traditional Make support.
  • Another Stable Update Released for the Linux 3.18 Kernel, Adds Many Improvements
    One day after announcing the release of the Linux 4.10.12, 4.9.24, and 4.4.63 kernels, Greg Kroah-Hartman informed the community about the availability of yet another maintenance update to the Linux 3.18 kernel series.
  • Kernel Developers Still Discussing Raising Linux's Compiler Requirements
    Linux kernel developers are still looking to raise the requirements of GCC for building the Linux kernel. It turns out some developers are still using GCC 4.1 for building the mainline Linux kernel, largely for MIPS and other niche architectures. Plus some developers still are using older GCC compiler releases for allegedly better compiler warnings. But at least in 2017 it's looking like there's some agreement on beginning to mandate later GCC 4.x compilers as a minimum for being able to build newer kernel releases.