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LinPC: PCLinuxOS Preinstalled Systems

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PCLOS
Hardware

Pay close attention to the details. At first glance our prices may seem higher than other Linux offerings. But our systems come standard with an AMD Athlon 4200+ dual-core cpu and 1GB DDR2 memory. We also use a Full tower case with a 430 watt power supply. We can not call our systems "Green" but it sure is upgradeable.

PCLinuxOS Box System

AMD x2 Athlon 4200+ dual core cpuAMD Athlon 64 X2 4200+ Socket AM2 Dual-Core CPU
LOGICRAM or Kingston DDR2 1GB
Foxconn DDR2, SATA w/on die Nvidia GPU
Foxconn/Winfast MCP61V Socket AM2 mATX Chipset: NVIDIA MCP61V
Front Side Bus: 2000MT/s HyperTransport™
Memory: Dual channel DDR2 800 / 667 x 4 DIMMs, Max 4GB
VGA on Die: Integrated Geforce 6100
Expansion Slots: 1 x PCIe x16, 1 x PCIe x1, 2 x PCI
IDE: ATA133 x 1
Serial ATA(SATA)/RAID: Serial ATA II x 2 with RAID 0, 1
Audio: 5.1 channel, Realtek ALC861 VD (HDA)
LAN: 10/100 M LAN, Realtek RTL8201CL (Phy)
Lite-on DVD Dual layer writer
Samsung or Lite-on DVDRW DL
Seagate 80GB SATA2 8mb HDDSeagate or Western Digital
SATA 80 GB 7200 rpm

All this for just $309.00US.


PCLinuxOS Complete System $499.00

Case = LinkWorld Full tower 430w ps
CPU = AMD Athlon 64 X2 4200+ Dual core
Mainboard = WinFast or Foxconn
NVIDIA Raid chipset w/onboard GeForce 6100
Rom = Samsung or LiteOn DVDRW-DL
HDD = Seagate or Western Digital SATA 80GB 7200rpm
Memory = LOGICRAM or Kingston DDR2 1GB 667MHZ
MULTIMEDIA Keyboard and Mouse combo and an AOC 17" 8MS LCD



PCLOS Super Box $579.00

PCLinuxOS pre-installed
AMD64 X2 6000+ Processor
MSI K9N4 ULTRA-F Motherboard
2GB DDR2 667 Memory
SEAGATE 250GB 7200RPM SATA2 16MB cache Hard Drive
20x DVD-RW LS Drive
Geforce NX8500GT 256MB PCI-E Video
Keyboard/Optical Mouse
2PC Black Speaker Set
430W ATX Full tower Case

More @ http://www.linpc.us




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