Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OpenSuSE 10.0 RC1 is here too!

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

What an exciting passed couple of days we've had. Mandriva 2006 RC1 and OpenSuSE 10.0 RC1 hitting the mirrors right about the same time. They are running neck and neck. Who will get their final to the market first? Mandrake has a history of missing release dates to fix last minute bugs and OpenSuSE seems to be hitting theirs - ready or not here it comes. In fact, OpenSuSE 10.0 RC1 actually hit the mirrors a little ahead of schedule this time. Their roadmap stated to expect RC1 on Sept 9, while the isos are dated Sept 7. Their dedicated work is showing in the mass of bug fixes, patches and updated versions. There is no new eyecandy or features this release. So how is it progressing?

As stated I didn't see any new eyecandy or features. However the big news is that gnome seems to be fixed for the most part. At version 2.12, they are ahead of Mandriva on that account. According to the cooker list, Mandriva will be shipping with 2.10. However sources say there really isn't much difference. Don't shoot the messenger, I don't use gnome enough to see any difference myself.

In opening and closing the gnome applications and playing with the settings, I only experienced one or two ooppsies. On the first click of the desktop icon "Computer," nautilus "quit unexpectedly". The error box gave three choices: Restart Application, Close, and Inform Developers. I supposed I should have clicked Inform Developers, but I admit I chose Restart Application. After this action nautilus seemed to operate normally and opened a file manager window. Clicking My Home opened a file manager window in my home directory displaying the available files without issue.

    

Then after that little issue, I clicked on the "Audio CD" icon and received a "Couldn't display "cdda:///dev/hdc" error. I clicked OK, but nothing else happened. No music player opened or anything.

Other than those two little issues, I didn't encounter any problems. I clicked around in all the window managers quite extensively changing settings, setting up accounts and whatnot and can report it seems OpenSuSE developers are doing a wonderful job and are making amazing progress in what is now the home stretch.

With the little annoying beagle bug fixed last development release, I thought I'd test drive it in gnome. It opened immediately and items are available for searching. Searching for the term 'desktop' pulled up 3 or 4 files matching that criteria. The interface is nice and clean, but I think I prefer the separate paned view of KAT in Mandriva. However, a little birdie told me Mandriva is considering not shipping with KAT installed by default afterall. There's not much doubt OpenSuSE will be including beagle.

Since I clocked and posted some of the important performance times for Mandriva 2006 RC1, I thought it might be interesting to compare the OpenSuSE 10.0 RC1 times. These are the times I clocked on the same AMD 2800+ machine:

  • Boot up: 26 seconds

  • KDE: 22 seconds
  • OpenOffice: 7 seconds
  • Firefox: 3 seconds (not counting loading the default Novell webpage)
  • Shutdown: 20 seconds

These times are not as speedy as Mandriva's, yet they are still impressive in their own right. I can still recall the days of 2 and 3 minutes boot ups for both distributions.

From here on out I suspect there won't be any obvious changes to the naked eye, and we will probably only be seeing bug fixes. Some package highlights this release include:

  • kernel-default-2.6.13-8

  • kdebase3-3.4.2-24
  • gnome-desktop-2.12.0-3
  • qt3-3.3.4-28
  • glibc-2.3.5-39
  • gcc-4.0.2_20050901-3
  • xorg-x11-6.8.2-96
  • OpenOffice_org-1.9.125-5
  • mozilla-1.7.11-9
  • MozillaFirefox-1.0.6-13
  • Full Rpm list as tested.

Some changelog highlights include:

++++ beagle-index:

- wait for index build to complete
(hack since there seems to be no way to keep it reliably
running in foreground ..)

++++ wireless-tools:

- ipw2200: added broadcast fix

++++ ktorrent:

- update 1.1rc1

++++ metacity:

- Update to version 2.12.0 (GNOME 2.12)

++++ OpenOffice_org:

- updated ooo-build to version 1.9.125.1.2:
* disabled some unreviewed patches [#114992]
* check buttons rendering problem [#80447]

++++ amarok:

- update to version 1.3.1

++++ dhcpcd:

- fix parsing of resolv.conf file when no 'search' line is present

++++ evolution:

- Update to version 2.4.0 (GNOME 2.12)
- Remove upstreamed patch

++++ kdebase3:

- apply fixes for kcheckpass

++++ nautilus:

- Add submount patch (90584)
- Fix spec to apply both desktop search patches
- Update to version 2.12.0 (GNOME 2.12)

++++ MozillaFirefox:

- fixed gconf-backend patch to be able to use
system prefs

++++Full Changelog since Beta 4.

New screenshots HERE.

Previous Coverage:

Beta 4
Beta 3
Beta 2
Beta 1

More in Tux Machines

RISC-V and NVIDIA

  • Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform Enlists Deep Learning Accelerator
    SiFive introduces what it’s calling the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA's Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology. A demo shown at the Hot Chips conference consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive's HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive's silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.
  • SiFive Announces First Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform With NVIDIA Deep Learning Accelerator Technology
    SiFive, the leading provider of commercial RISC-V processor IP, today announced the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA's Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology. The demo will be shown this week at the Hot Chips conference and consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive's HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the world's first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is well suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive's silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.
  • SiFive Announces Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform with Nvidia Deep Learning Accelerator Technology
    SiFive, a leading provider of commercial RISC-V processor IP, today announced the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA’s Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology. The demo will be shown this week at the Hot Chips conference and consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive’s HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the world’s first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is well suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive’s silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.
  • NVIDIA Unveils The GeForce RTX 20 Series, Linux Benchmarks Should Be Coming
    NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang has just announced the GeForce RTX 2080 series from his keynote ahead of Gamescom 2018 this week in Cologne, Germany.
  • NVIDIA have officially announced the GeForce RTX 2000 series of GPUs, launching September
    The GPU race continues on once again, as NVIDIA have now officially announced the GeForce RTX 2000 series of GPUs and they're launching in September. This new series will be based on their Turing architecture and their RTX platform. These new RT Cores will "enable real-time ray tracing of objects and environments with physically accurate shadows, reflections, refractions and global illumination." which sounds rather fun.

today's leftovers

GNOME Shell, Mutter, and Ubuntu's GNOME Theme

Benchmarks on GNU/Linux

  • Linux vs. Windows Benchmark: Threadripper 2990WX vs. Core i9-7980XE Tested
    The last chess benchmark we’re going to look at is Crafty and again we’re measuring performance in nodes per second. Interestingly, the Core i9-7980XE wins out here and saw the biggest performance uplift when moving to Linux, a 5% performance increase was seen opposed to just 3% for the 2990WX and this made the Intel CPU 12% faster overall.
  • Which is faster, rsync or rdiff-backup?
    As our data grows (and some filesystems balloon to over 800GBs, with many small files) we have started seeing our night time backups continue through the morning, causing serious disk i/o problems as our users wake up and regular usage rises. For years we have implemented a conservative backup policy - each server runs the backup twice: once via rdiff-backup to the onsite server with 10 days of increments kept. A second is an rsync to our offsite backup servers for disaster recovery. Simple, I thought. I will change the rdiff-backup to the onsite server to use the ultra fast and simple rsync. Then, I'll use borgbackup to create an incremental backup from the onsite backup server to our off site backup servers. Piece of cake. And with each server only running one backup instead of two, they should complete in record time. Except, some how the rsync backup to the onsite backup server was taking almost as long as the original rdiff-backup to the onsite server and rsync backup to the offsite server combined. What? I thought nothing was faster than the awesome simplicity of rsync, especially compared to the ancient python-based rdiff-backup, which hasn't had an upstream release since 2009.