Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ten things your lawyers need to know about open-source

Filed under
OSS

In ever-growing numbers, CIOs want to take advantage of the many benefits that free and open-source software have to offer their companies.

But there's a snag. Their lawyers can be grouchy when it comes to open-source. They claim opening the door to open-source software carries unacceptable legal risk. Many imply naively or wrongly that proprietary software doesn't carry its own risks. Some describe open-source software in pejorative terms and repeat the biased conclusions of well-financed FUD (fear, uncertainty and doubt) programs. They point to assertions made by high-profile CEOs that proprietary software companies will soon come knocking on their doors looking for money to compensate them for intellectual property that open-source allegedly infringes.

Some lawyers may even counsel their clients to steer clear altogether (as if that were a choice), never mind if that means losing out on the strategic opportunities open-source offers.

As a CIO you may ask, what's gotten into my lawyers?

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu GNOME 16.04.1 LTS Released but Still Doesn't Uses the GNOME 3.20 Stack

As we reported last week, Canonical published the first point release of its long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, offering users new installation mediums with all the updates made available since April 21, 2016. Read more

KDE Applications 16.08 Software Suite Is in Beta, Final Release Coming August 18

Now that the third and last maintenance update of the KDE Applications 16.04 software suite has debuted, it's time for us to take the Beta build of the next major KDE Applications release for a test drive. Read more

Android Leftovers

Lennart Poettering Announces systemd 231 Init System [sic] for GNU/Linux Distributions

Today, July 25, 2016, systemd creator Lennart Poettering has proudly announced the release and general availability of the systemd 231 init system for major GNU/Linux OSes. Bringing lots of fixes and numerous additions, systemd 231 is now the most advanced version of the modern and controversial init system that has been adopted in the last few years by more and more Linux kernel-based operating systems, including Fedora, Ubuntu, Arch Linux, openSUSE, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and many others. Read more