Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

NVIDIA 173.08 Linux Display Driver Released

Filed under
Software

Last week it was exclusively reported by Phoronix that a new NVIDIA binary Linux display driver should be out in the next week, and sure enough we were right, again. The NVIDIA 173.08 Linux driver was released last night and features support for several new NVIDIA GPUs, including the GeForce 9800 series, experimental support for X Server 1.5, and a number of fixes with Linux 2.6.25 kernel compatibility.

The new NVIDIA products supported by this 173.08 binary driver update include the GeForce 8400, 8400GS, 9500M GS, 9600GT, 9800GTX, and 9800GX2. The GeForce 9600GT has actually been supported since the previous release when we had reviewed the GeForce 9600GT 512MB on Linux. The big product support additions are just for the mobile GeForce 9 GPUs and the GeForce 9800 series. On the workstation side, the Quadro FX 3600M and Quadro FX 4600/5600 SDI and Quadro G-Sync II are now supported by this Linux driver.

This x86/x86_64 driver release now allows OpenGL rendering to extend beyond 4096 pixels wide for GeForce 8/9 graphics cards, which was an earlier limitation of this driver. OpenGL rendering should also now be fixed of corruption issues when using textured compressed with the DXT5 algorithm.

More Here




Also: 32 Bit Download

Linux x64 (AMD64/EM64T) Download

More in Tux Machines

Terminal app appears in Chome OS Dev, hints at future Linux application support

Back in February, some commits to the Chromium codebase revealed that Chrome OS would soon run Linux applications using a container. While it has been possible for years to run Linux applications on top of Chrome OS using crouton, it's a hacky solution that only works in Developer Mode. Google's solution would presumably work better, and perhaps not require Dev Mode to be enabled. Read more

​What's the most popular Linux of them all?

Let's cut to the chase. Android is the most popular of all Linux distributions. Period. End of statement. But that's not the entire story. Still it must be said, according to StatCounter, Android is the most popular of all operating systems. By a score of 39.49 percent to 36.63 percent, Android beats out Windows for global personal device supremacy. Sorry Windows, you had a nice run, but between your smartphone failures and the PC decline, your day is done. But, setting Android aside, what's the most popular Linux? It's impossible to work that out. The website-based analysis tools, such as those used by StatCounter, NetMarketShare, and the Federal government's Digital Analytics Program (DAP), can't tell the difference between Fedora, openSUSE, and Ubuntu. DAP does give one insightful measurement the others sites don't give us. While not nearly as popular as Android, Chrome OS is more popular than all the other Linux-based desktops combined by a score, in April 2018, of 1.3 percent to 0.6 percent of end users. Read more

Android/ChromeOS/Google Leftovers

Games: SC-Controller 0.4.2, Campo Santo, Last Epoch and More