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Linux Magazine Italy Interview with Texstar of PCLOS

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PCLOS
Interviews

I did an interview for Linux Magazine Italy - April Issue 2008. Here is a re-print of the interview for our English speaking members.

1) Hi guys, thank you for your availability. We want to introduce you to our readers. Can you tell us something about you? What's your work? What do you do in your life and your sparetime? What are your hobbies?

My name is Bill Reynolds aka Texstar. I am a 46 year old former banking professional with 17 years experience in retail banking management. I retired from banking in 1997 and started a small home based computer repair business. Most of my time is spent either repairing computers or working on PCLinuxOS. I enjoy bbqing, hanging out with friends by the pool in the summer months, watching Nascar auto racing and American football.

2) From how long do you use GNU/Linux and why?

It got started with Linux using Red Hat 5.2. I had become disenchanted with Windows. I wanted to get away from an OS that wouldn't let me have control over my computer. It was forcing me to install things I didn't want or need. I soon moved on from Red Hat to Mandrake Linux because it was a revolutionary operating system for its time. Mandrake Linux had its roots in Red Hat but featured KDE instead of Gnome and had the ambitious goal of providing graphical installation and configuration tools. I became hooked.

3) You are the main developers of PCLinuxOS, one of the most interesting GNU/Linux distribution nowadays. What is PCLinuxOS? What's its philosophy and how and when was born? Why do you decided to create another GNU/Linux distribution?

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