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Drigg (the pligg alternative) vs. Pligg: why should people switch?

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Software

As some of you already know, I am the main developer for Drigg. I donated probably more than 1000 hours of my life to the Drigg project, because I believed in it. After reviewing existing CMSs out there, I believe that Drigg is the best system available today for people who want to create Digg-like sites (but, in fact, when people deploy Drigg they get fully functional Drupal sites…!). You can see my contributions to Drigg daily. One more programmer has joined Drigg, which is going right ahead.

However, Drigg’s community is still smaller than Pligg, its main competitor. Why?

I am not sure about the answer. If you look at the raw number, if you search for “Drigg” in Google you get 86000 pages; if you search for Pligg, you get nearly 6 million pages. Mind you, Pligg is a very unique name, whereas Drigg’s results are helped by the town of Drigg. A lot of pages pointing to Pligg are people looking for Pligg experts, able to solve quirks and otherwise inexplicable issues. Drigg, on the other hand, is extremely stable and well engineered. Sometimes, I wonder if I should add quirks and random problems just to give users a reason to get together and work on something?

more here




re: Drigg

All those development hours and they (nor their competition) couldn't take a few to come up with a decent name?

Reminds me of the way old SNL skit where a law firm (or some biz suit firm anyways) has a TV commercial and at the end they flash up their new web site address and it's www.clownpenis.fart, with a little tiny legal disclaimer underneath it saying "since all the other domain names were already taken".

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