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Google closed source app engine does evil

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Google

Google, the monolithic empire which once could do no wrong, has churned out another new product for its web 2.0+ conga line. This time Google App Engine gives the great promise of letting you serve your own applications to the world using the grunt of Google-powered machinery. However, it’s not the saviour it purports to be, perverting the open source way.

On the surface, Google’s App Engine sounds top stuff. You can run your own web applications on Google’s infrastructure. Write code, upload to site, Google serve to world. What could be simpler?

Indeed, anyone who has thought they could cash in on the cult of Facebook soon discovers Facebook won’t host your application. Instead you can now use Google’s App Engine which exists solely to serve apps from reliable servers that will eat up heavy loads. You get a free domain name under appspot.com or you can use your own domain. You get 500MB of storage along with plenty of CPU and bandwidth for about 5 million page views per month.

More here

Also: Google says “sod it... lets do a bit of evil” (@ tchcrunch)

And: A whole new world to explore (Google Earth 4.3)




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