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Reiser Prosecutor to Jurors: 'You Know He Killed Her'

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Reiser

The prosecutor in the Hans Reiser murder trial on Wednesday continued for a second day to poke at Linux programmer Hans Reiser's defense to accusations he murdered his wife two years ago.

"There's no other conclusion you can draw. He killed Nina," prosecutor Paul Hora said as he concluded his closing argument. "Right when she's dead, he begins to cover it up."
"The story itself is absurd."

Hora captivated the jury with his sometimes thunderous oration, declaring Reiser's testimony about his own behavior following Nina Reiser's disappearance on Sept. 3, 2006 as a "fabrication" and "absurd."

"His explanation just doesn't make sense. It just doesn’t make sense," Hora declared.
The defendant's attorney, William DuBois, is expected to begin his closing arguments after the lunch break.

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Linux programmer Hans Reiser's defense attorney told jurors here during his closing arguments Wednesday that his client did not kill his wife, "not because he is a nice guy, but the evidence in this case has not proven the crime."

"Hans' conduct can be interpreted as being guilty. It can also be interpreted as innocence, and a product of his own platypus-ian personality, as we will see," defense attorney William DuBois told jurors.

"He is odd in every way," DuBois said.

DuBois, who was summarizing for jurors his geek defense, labeled his client a "duckbill platypus" and said any guilt-like behavior the defendant exhibited in the aftermath of his wife's disappearance could easily be explained because Reiser is paranoid and "socially inept."

"Why did he act the way he acts?" DuBois asked as he held a miniature platypus stuffed animal.

Answering himself, he replied: "He does not understand social cues. He shows almost no emotion is because he has no emotion."

Reiser Defense Blasts Prosecution; Geek Defense Re-Deployed




And: Hans Reiser Trial: April 16, 2008

People's opinions

Personally, I don't think this is even news. All that is really relevant is that Namesys is no more.
In any way, wired.com tends to over bloat stuff. Even if this was "news" some time ago, it's not anymore. Wired.com just like to show their "we cover news" or their "we personally want Reiser in jail" attitudes.

I would rather however not see the word "Linux" in Reiser related articles.

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