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Slashdot Offering 30 Minute Advance Look

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Web

The DayPass, offered by Slashdot's parent Open Source Technology Group, will give users the chance to see new stories and content first.

They've got money to spend and will opt-in to see your advertisement, Slashdot owner OSTG says on its web site. DMNews.com points to the story on how those desirable Slashdot readers can be reached with a new advertising device called the DayPass.

By logging in and agreeing to view an interstitial ad, DayPass users gain access to stories before other readers, 30 minutes ahead of them. OSTG cites Slashdot's 85,000 registered readers as "the most valuable early-adopter IT audience on the Web today." DayPass compels a 15-second viewing of the interstitial; further, the DayPass sponsor gets "exclusive ownership of all ad positions on DayPass pages."

Full Story.

And

And this is a "GOOD" thing?

re: And

lol, well, for me it might be. Big Grin

I was gonna say 'or visit here and get it 3 days before!' Tongue

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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