Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gentoo Frustrations - Back to PC-BSD

Filed under
Gentoo

Using Gentoo Linux, you have to get used to things just breaking, especially in the last couple of years. Portage is probably one of the best package management systems in the open source community. I have been quite impressed with Portage 2 the last couple months. Things seem to be improving.

Yesterday I woke up to check some email. Later I needed to do some web development for an NGO. I booted up and by the time I got to the graphical login screen, I noticed that I had a problem with my screen resolution.

I checked xorg.conf but there was nothing wrong with it. I kept restarting X only to get a very low resolution screen. Everything worked fine. I experienced this problem before with Sabayon Linux and an earlier version of Gentoo. No configuration files were changed in the last couple of days. I had not emerged and updated newer versions of nvidia-drivers, xorg, or KDE.

Sadly, the same thing happened back in 2005 which forced me to switch to Kubuntu.

More Here




re: Gentoo

Funny how the guy says Gentoo now breaks too often so he'll stop using it on his desktop and focus on using it ON HIS SERVER.

Why do so many people (no matter what their choice of OS is) apologize for, and put up with, such crappy stuff?

Interesting but I never said

Interesting but I never said "Gentoo now breaks too often". Gentoo packages, like any other distro, breaks once in a while. Strangely enough, I do not remember apologizing either...

I found out that Compiz-Fusion messed up my screen resolution so I just removed it. The same thing happened when I installed Sabayon, I just needed to disable Compiz.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Ten Years as Desktop Linux User: My Open Source World, Then and Now

I've been a regular desktop Linux user for just about a decade now. What has changed in that time? Keep reading for a look back at all the ways that desktop Linux has become easier to use -- and those in which it has become more difficult -- over the past ten years. I installed Linux to my laptop for the first time in the summer of 2006. I started with SUSE, then moved onto Mandriva and finally settled on Fedora Core. By early 2007 I was using Fedora full time. There was no more Windows partition on my laptop. When I ran into problems or incompatibilities with Linux, my options were to sink or swim. There was no Windows to revert back to. Read more

OpenStack Ocata announced, then briefly withheld

Android Leftovers