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Programmer Implements Linux As ActiveX Applet

Filed under
Humor

In what could be the greatest programming achievement since the invention of curly braces, James Hacker has successfully shoehorned a bare-bones Linux distribution into an ActiveX applet running under Internet Explorer and Windows XP.

The system, code-named NAPWOT (Not A Pointless Waste Of Time), includes the Linux kernel, critical system programs, assorted userspace applications, and even a hacked version of the X Window System to provide a GUI-within-a-GUI.

Hacker was quick to point out that his creation is much more than just a toy curiosity. It can be used to smuggle Linux into the workplace without drawing the attention of Pointy Haired Bosses or Bastard MCSEs From Hell. "The only way to stop NAPWOT would be to ban ActiveX from the entire corporate network. And that, of course, would be a good thing in its own right."

The best part, however, is that NAPWOT makes it possible to run Mozilla -- from within Internet Explorer.

Full Story.

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