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Reiser Guilty of First Degree Murder

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Reiser

Hans Reiser was found guilty today of first-degree murder. Reiser appeared shocked as the verdict was read, he looked at the crowd and then mumbled to the bailiffs as he was led out of the courtroom.

A moment of suspense filled the courtroom as each juror was shown the verdict form and asked if it represented their ruling. It wasn't until after all 12 jurors saw the paper did the judge declare the verdict out loud.

Reiser was wearing a blue suit jacket and white button-down shirt. Before the verdict, he chatted with his attorney William DuBois before the jury arrived in the courtroom. While Reiser appeared nervous, the jury appeared cheerful as they could be heard laughing before entering the courtroom and some had smiles on their face as they sat in the jury box.

Meanwhile, the gallery was filled with reporters and members of the Alameda County District Attorney's office, including District Attorney Tom Orloff.

The verdict will ends a trial that lasted more than six months, in which the prosectution presented a mountain of circumstantial evidence against the 44-year-old computer engineer while the defense pointed to a lack of direct evidence that linked their client with a murder that has never produced a body. The story of Hans and Nina Reiser began in 1998 when Reiser was visiting Russia to hire computer engineers for his burgeoning file system software company. Reiser took to going to marriage agencies, trying to find Russian women looking for American men.

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Also: More Coverage @ wired blogs

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