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Commercial KVM-based virtual desktop program arrives

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Software

KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine), Linux's own baked-in virtualization program, has been gaining popularity. Now, Qumranet, the company behind KVM, is releasing a commercial virtual desktop called Solid ICE based on KVM technology.

Solid ICE is designed to run multiple virtual desktops in a KVM on servers. While the servers need to be running Linux 2.6.20 or higher, Solid ICE can be used to deploy Windows or Linux desktops on either thin clients or repurposed PCs.

The servers must run on x86 processors that support virtualization extensions. These include Intel's VT (Virtualization Technology a.k.a. Vanderpool) and AMD's AMD-V (a.k.a. Pacifica) technologies.

According to Benny Schnaider, Qumranet's CEO and co-founder, Solid ICE gives users "desktop virtualization done right. There are no compromises and you won't be able to tell you're working on a virtual desktop." In Solid ICE, each VM has its own private virtualized hardware: a network card, disk, graphics adapter, and so on. The program also "hooks into existing infrastructure" to provide better desktop image management, provisioning management, policy enforcement, and security.

This isn't all done with open source software though.

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