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PackageKit Critique

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If you haven’t heard, PackageKit is an exciting and upcoming project who’s goal is to create a user friendly package handling abstraction layer that is independent of distro and package format. Basically, the Grand Unified Package GUI for those more physics-minded. Sounds good like a good idea.

There are a few problems I have with the way PackageKit is heading, though, and hopefully this is a constructive critique that may help people think about these issues. I’m not a package management expert and I’ve only used PackageKit a bit on the soon-to-be-released Fedora 9 so please shout out if I get my facts wrong.

1. The PackageKit FAQ and people promoting PackageKit seem to often say something along the lines of “we’re not trying to replace “. I can’t help but think that, if it’s not designed to replace anything, is it really going to be all the unifying?

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