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OpenSuSE 10.3 on my laptop

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SUSE

Sontek and I have talked several times about SuSE, and that I should use it. I have used it, in a VM, and I have to agree when I am told that it isn't really fair to say that using a vm is the same as having a native install. Not in para-virtualization anyway. So, I installed OpenSuSE 10.3 on my laptop just to check it out. If it can run on my laptop then it must be good, because my laptop sucks. I have an Averatec, their moto is cheap and you know it (at least that is what I think it is.)

So heres what I came up with:

Pros:

* YaST actually isn't that bad for installing stuff. Their one click install is quite nice, and pretty convenient.
* Both ALT buttons work. I want to know how they did that because gosh, that is nice.
* Hibernate actually works, a hard feet.

Rest Here




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