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Tyan Thunder n3600M with Linux

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Hardware
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Two months ago we had looked at the Tyan Tempest i5400XT motherboard, which was Tyan's latest product based upon Intel's newest workstation chipset and had support for dual Intel Xeon quad-core processors. We found the Tempest i5400XT to be a real winner and everything had worked terrific with Linux. Today we are looking at another Tyan workstation motherboard but the tides have turned as we look at their latest AMD dual quad-core solution, the Tyan Thunder n3600M. The Thunder n3600M motherboard supports dual AMD "Barcelona" Opteron processors, 16 sticks of DDR2 RAM, and eight SAS ports, among other stunning features.

Specifications:

Processor
- Two µPGA 1207-pin ZIF sockets
- AMD Opteron Rev. F 2000 Series Santa Rosa Dual Core Support
- AMD Opteron Rev. F 2300 Series Barcelona Quad Core Support
- Support AMD Dual Dynamic Power Management
- Integrated 128-bit DDR Memory Controller

Chipset
- nVIDIA nForce Pro 3600
- NEC nPD720400
- SMSC DME5017
- LSI 1068E

Memory
- Dual memory channels
- Supports up to 16 DDR II-533/667 DIMMs
- Up to 64 GB of register ECC/non-ECC memory

More Here




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