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Dell releases Laptop with Mandriva

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MDV

September, 16th, Mandriva, the number one European Linux publisher, today announces the availability of a Dell Laptop pre-loaded With Mandriva Linux. The association - a first for the two companies - represents a milestone in Mandriva's effort to make Linux even more accessible to customers, thanks to large OEM deals. Mandriva also counts HP in its portfolio of leading manufacturers.

Mandriva worked with Dell to certify this first consumer laptop, which is now being sold direct to students by Dell. The company ensured the optimum integration of its Mandriva Linux Limited Edition 2005 - a major hit in recent Linux downloads and reviews - with Dell's Latitude 110L. The certified computer is a WIFI 1,4 to 1,7 GHZ mobile Celeron or Pentium M, with 256 to 1280 MB of ram, and a DVD Drive.

"This product shows the world that Mandriva is today ready for the consumer market. We've been developing products for the corporate and enthusiast markets for years. Addressing the needs of the consumer market is a different challenge, because it is all the more difficult, as you don't have a system admin or professional technician at home", said François Bancilhon, Mandriva CEO. "Consumer products leave less room for imperfection. This laptop and its distribution direct by such a leading manufacturer as Dell, demonstrate how easy Mandriva Linux is to use. We're looking forward to further collaboration with Dell."

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