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The computer security paradox

Filed under
Security

One of the most prized rights of any American is the right to privacy and security. It's something people in some countries would kill for. Yet now there appears to be a very frightening trend growing. Your privacy and security are being thrown out the window wholesale in favor of easier access by law enforcement. A recent example of this can be seen with the announcement that Microsoft has been providing a tool to investigators that can effectively rip your Windows security to shreds in seconds, exposing all your private data to whoever wants to look at it.

And if that wasn't bad enough, just days later, word came down the pipe that the TSA and Homeland Security are free to search your laptop at the border anytime they so please. And these two aren't the only examples. There's pages and pages of stories that tell about how your computer privacy and security are being tossed out the window, and your private, personal data being stripped naked for anyone to see. If you're even the slightest bit human, this ought to terrify you.

But at the same time, your quest for what is your God given right makes you no friend of law enforcement. Your quest for security and privacy makes their job a lot harder. Of course if you're a good, law abiding citizen, you should have no problems with anyone from the TSA, Homeland Security, the police, or any law enforcement branch diving through our personal files at will. Right?

Wrong.




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