Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The computer security paradox

Filed under

One of the most prized rights of any American is the right to privacy and security. It's something people in some countries would kill for. Yet now there appears to be a very frightening trend growing. Your privacy and security are being thrown out the window wholesale in favor of easier access by law enforcement. A recent example of this can be seen with the announcement that Microsoft has been providing a tool to investigators that can effectively rip your Windows security to shreds in seconds, exposing all your private data to whoever wants to look at it.

And if that wasn't bad enough, just days later, word came down the pipe that the TSA and Homeland Security are free to search your laptop at the border anytime they so please. And these two aren't the only examples. There's pages and pages of stories that tell about how your computer privacy and security are being tossed out the window, and your private, personal data being stripped naked for anyone to see. If you're even the slightest bit human, this ought to terrify you.

But at the same time, your quest for what is your God given right makes you no friend of law enforcement. Your quest for security and privacy makes their job a lot harder. Of course if you're a good, law abiding citizen, you should have no problems with anyone from the TSA, Homeland Security, the police, or any law enforcement branch diving through our personal files at will. Right?


More in Tux Machines

Slackel Linux: Not Your Father's Slackware

You might think of the Slackel distro as a better Slackware derivative. Slackware dates back to 1992. By comparison, well-known and well-used distros such as Ubuntu, Fedora and Linux Mint were introduced in the mid-2000s. So Slackware is among the oldest actively maintained Linux distros. Despite its longevity, it has not joined more modern Linux offspring in terms of user friendliness. Read more

Android 6.0 Marshmallow Review: Google Outsmarts Apple By Guessing Your Next Move

It may seem like a big decision, but something tells me the service arms race is going to be a lot like the feature race. Google has the nose on Apple with Google Now on Tap until… Apple figures out a way to borrow it. Read more

Red Hat News

IBM releases Power-based Linux servers with Nvidia GPUs

The Power Systems LC line was introduced by Dr Stefanie Chiras, director and business line executive of IBM scale-out Power Systems, as part of her keynote on the subject of 'waitless computing'. IBM, as a patron of the OpenPower Foundation, has been a staunch supporter of Linux and OpenStack, and this represents a logical step for the company, as it has been building its Power line following the sale of its x86 server business to Lenovo in 2014. Read more